• Ag Report: July 27, 2012

    Shelby gets $20,000 for food banks program

    Shelby County has received $20,000 – the largest piece of the $47,500 distributed – from state agricultural development funds for is “Farms to Food Banks” program.

    Gov. Steve Beshear announced the grant this week, which also includes four other grants: Allen ($5,000), Casey ($2,500), Jessamine ($10,000) and Garrard ($10,000).

  • Shelby farmer growing his Henry County market for sustainable foods

    CAMPBELLSBURG – Capstone Produce in Campbellsburg was the provider for the recent Forecastle Music Festival in Louisville, and for its owner, Cropper farmer David Neville, this is another step toward bringing locally produced sustainable agriculture into the mainstream conversation.

  • WICHE: Dividing plants improves health, bloom

    We have all asked the question: “Why hasn’t my plant bloomed?”

    Sometimes the answer is as simple as not enough sunlight, not old enough, not cold enough or hot enough, etc. In fact it could be as simple as a little digging and dividing for some renewed blooming attitude.

  • Reichert is new horticulture extension agent

    A familiar name and face has a new role in the Shelby County agricultural scene.

    Walt Reichert, former editor of The Sentinel-Newsand faculty member of Jefferson Community & Technical College’s Shelby County campus, is the new horticulture technician at the University of Kentucky’s Shelby County Extension Office. He replaces Corinne Kephart, who recently moved from that job to be the agriculture agent.

  • Ag Report: July 20, 2012

    Collins student returns from ag leadership event

    Collins High School student Spencer Hammond recently returned home from Kentucky Farm Bureau’s Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders, where he and 41 other high school students from around the state attended the 5-day summer leadership conference, held in June at the University of Kentucky.

    An identical IFAL conference also was held at Murray State University for an additional 42 students.

  • WICHE: Small ears may mean poor pollination for corn

    I gave up growing corn a long time ago. I figured others can grow it better than I, so why take up the space. I drive by Gallrein Farms in Bagdad twice a week, and their “sweet corn” sign has been hung, so there are no worries. They have the best corn this side of the Mississippi.

  • Shelby County's summer crops aren’t so hot

    Farmers in Shelby County are asking for help getting their crops in this year – and it’s not just for people with strong backs either.

    “If you know any rain dances…or go wash your car, or whatever,” said Leo Young, who operates a farm near Simpsonville. “I’m trying to stay upbeat, but we could use some rain.”

    Recent scorching temperatures coupled with a dearth of moisture have combined to put the local growing season in possible peril.

  • WICHE: Fear not, bamboo can be controlled

    Most of us have learned to fear bamboo. I used to think that the only good place for them was in planting beds that were smack-dab-in-the-middle of parking lots…no chance of a runner reaching your garden in that case.

    It’s the horror stories that stick with us. We usually only hear about the invasive claims about bamboo and how it escaped a neighbor’s yard only to take over your prized perennial bed.

    Well, anything left unchecked can become a problem, and there are ways to contain invasive bamboos; and some that don’t even need it.

  • Ag Report: July 13, 2012

    Ag Commissioner Comer issues alert about crops, animal care

  • Ag Report: July 6, 2012

    Collins student Eades wins state FFA contest

    Sarah Eades, a senior member of the Collins High School FFA, won the state championship for extemporaneous speaking at the convention held at Rupp Arena in Lexington and will advance to the national competition in October in Indianapolis.