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Agriculture

  • Shelby County wheat farmers hoping for good harvest

    Wheat production may not be a farmer’s bread-and-butter crop in Shelby County, but thanks to an almost non-existent winter and a mild spring, most farmers in the county not only have enjoyed a slightly larger yield but also  already have harvested their crops.

    “I just finished harvesting; now I’m getting ready to plant soybeans,” said Paul Hornback, who said he got 80 bushels of wheat per acre from the 100 acres he had planted on his farm near Bagdad.

  • WICHE: Edible flowers tasty and pretty

    I think about food so much this time of the year because vegetables abound. I just came home from working at Courtney Farms in Bagdad with a load of vegetables that will be presented to Community Supported Agriculture subscribers for a weekend gathering of shared experiences and shared food. We are combining our farming efforts to bring food to local families, and that includes the pretty things that can be added and eaten in the mix.

  • Ag Report: June 15, 2012

    5 Shelby students win

    Farm Bureau scholarships

    Callie Anderson, a senior at Collins High School, Hannah George, Rachel White and Gwen Martin, all seniors at Shelby County High School, and Tyler Bitzer, a student at the University of Kentucky, each have won 2012 college scholarships from Kentucky Farm Bureau.

  • WICHE: Furry pests in the garden, barriers best bet

    If you have a garden, chances are you appreciate nature in all its glory. But sometimes nature gets in the way of our desires to cultivate.

    Deer browsing, rabbit munching, squirrel digging, bird pecking, mole trenching and resident vole feasting have all come up in the last two weeks. I have no silver bullet for any of these problems. but I do have some practical approaches to offset the shared use of our gardens.

  • Ag Report: June 8, 2012

    Brookshier departs extension

    for governor’s ag policy board

    Tammy Brookshier has left her role as ag programs coordinator/CAIP administrator for Shelby County to join the Governor’s Office of Ag Policy in Frankfort as a programs coordinator.

    Brookshier had worked at the Shelby County Extension Office for the past 5-plus years and oversaw the distribution of ag development funds to enterprises in the county, and her interaction with the governor’s ag office led to the new position.

  • WICHE: Spinosad is a new weapon among natural insecticides

    After the heat-wave in late May the blueberries ripened like wildfire, the Colorado potato beetle larva peppered the Pontiac potato patch and the cabbage worms nearly devoured my kale.

    I would pick and squish and drown, but so much was happening at once I needed a little assistance.

    As you know, I do not use chemical pesticides in the vegetable garden. I will reach for a bio-insecticide if I must, however.

  • WICHE: Desert blooms in Kentuckiana?

    We have a beautiful prickly pear cactus in bloom right now that is flaunting yellow and orange blooms like a peacock does feathers. It is tucked in a garden on the south side of the house so it thrives. In fact this cactus is native to Kentucky even if most people only associate it with the desert Southwest.

    When it comes to prickly plants most of us automatically think of cacti in the desert; there are others with a more subtle prick to consider for the mixed border. Look into adding some texture with Acanthus, Echinops and Eryngium.

  • Ag Report: June 1, 2012

    Thomas named state’s most

    influential agriculture figure

    An informal poll of more than 100 individuals from across the state by Keeton Communications has determined that Roger Thomas of Smith’s Grove is the state’s most influential person in agriculture.

    Those surveyed ranged from farmers to leaders of commodity groups, and for the past four weeks plus, the Ag Report has counted down the top 10.

  • Ag Report: May 25, 2012

    KFB seeks to honor

    best ag educators

    Kentucky Farm Bureau is searching for 2012 Excellence in Ag Literacy Award nominees. The award, bestowed annually by KFB during its annual meeting, was established to recognize and reward teachers who excel in their efforts to incorporate agricultural concepts throughout their core academic studies.

  • WICHE: The unseen heroes of the garden

    Have you ever considered the nematode? I appreciate the beneficial insects that help keep the garden in balance, but there are good things at work that go unseen.

    I recently released who knows how many in and around my vegetable garden in hopes that they will finally take care of my most annoying vegetable pest: the flea beetle.