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Agriculture

  • A business as sweet as honey

    There is a serious buzz around the new business of friends and neighbors Dr. George Raque and Steve Smith.

    Over the past five years the two have been working together to build one very sweet business. Raque and Smith are the co-owners of Bee Boys Honey, a quickly growing Shelbyville business.

    Never heard of them? That’s about to change.

    “We just started going after it,” Smith said, explaining that they just began selling their honey commercially over the past year.

  • Shelby senior 4-H team wins state livestock judging competition

    The Shelby County 4-H livestock judging team took first place in the High Senior Team overall honors for the second year in a row at the state 4-H Livestock Judging competition.

  • WICHE: Make sure to harvest vegetables daily

    One day missed in the vegetable garden can mean a big harvest, literally.  All of a sudden, or so it seems, your zucchini is the size of a torpedo and beans are bulging beneath the pod.

    Some vegetables need attention daily; others can be picked every couple of days.  Summer squash and zucchini definitely need to be checked each day because their growth rate is rather fast. 

  • Scholarship winners

    Shelby County Cattlemen’s Association president Irvin Kupper (second left) presents John McKinney, Tyler Goodlett and Matthew Young with $2,500 scholarships at the Cattlemen’s annual picnic in July.

  • Ag report: July 25, 2014

    Kentucky Small Ruminant Profit School

    offered for first time

    The Small Ruminant Profit School (SRPS) is now taking registrations. SRPS is an educational program of four classes over six month for sheep and goat producers that covers topics ranging from breeds, types of operations, facilities/equipment, health management, parasite management, foot care, marketing, genetics & selection, and much more.

    Benefits of SRPS:

  • WICHE: It’s time to dig, divide irises, daylilies

    Why is it that the perfect time to dig and divide your iris bed is in July at the height of the season’s heat? 

    For bearded iris it’s because they go through a dormant period in the summer.  This hardy perennial is a beautiful spring bloomer that is virtually immune to diseases.  But to ensure health and vigor you should divide your bearded iris every three to five years.  If they receive adequate sunlight (at least 6 hours a day) but do not bloom well then it is definitely time to divide.

  • Poor pollination can hold back corn crop

    Small stalks, small ears, poor kernel development… does this describe your corn crop this year? Or maybe the raccoons absconded with the crop!

    If this sounds like you there may be several factors at work. Drought at the wrong time can stunt your corn crop and cold damage can stunt corn. If you put your crop out early you could see a little stunting from a late spring cold snap. And poor drainage and poor soil fertility, especially nitrogen, can stunt the crop as well.

  • Ag report: July 18, 2014

    Tobacco funds restored

    Although a tobacco settlement arbitration that was not in Kentucky’s favor could have led to deep cuts to Kentucky Agricultural Development Funds, a new agreement with tobacco manufacturers will restore almost all of those monies, according to agricultural and state officials.

  • Distilleries officially have a new home

    The Shelbyville City Council finished with its amendments and approval of changes to the zoning text amendment, which will allow distilleries on 25-acre properties zoned Agricultural within the city limits.

    Thursday, council members approved a second reading of amendments to ordinance relating to non-domestic animals, including an addition of a line to include that any preexisting fences in place on agricultural property prior to the rezoning of adjacent property would be exempt from the 100-foot setback requirement.

  • Harsh winter didn’t stop pests

    Dinners on the patio, gardening, swimming in the pool and taking a quiet walk are all wonderful ways to enjoy summertime in Shelbyville; they are also excellent ways to get mosquito bites.

    While you may think the mosquitoes are worse than ever, University of Kentucky extension entomologist Lee Townsend explained that at the beginning of each mosquito season people often tend to think that way.

    “They shock us every summer,” he said, explaining that the number of mosquitoes has not increased from previous years.