• From kindergarten to the garden

    Chosen from among 1,800 Kentucky Proud Farmers, Brooke Eckmann of Ambrosia Farm in Finchville, has been selected as one of three honorees for the 2014 Local Food Hero.

    In its second year, the award recognizes farmers whom not only grow delicious food, but also contribute to their communities by conserving water, soil and wildlife.

    “It’s really unbelievable to me to be chosen from among the local farmers, let alone across the state, we have great farmers in the area,” Eckmann said.

  • WICHE: Bumper crop of squash not a sure thing

    You know all the jokes about people having bumper crops of summer squash? 

    Squash shows up in people’s cars or in public spaces because there is so much that the gardener can’t even give it away.  Well, that’s never really been a problem for me. 

    I have a little bit of that problem this year, and I give credit to the variety and the fact that it was plated later than usual.  Others, however, have not been so blessed.

  • Ag report: Aug. 15, 2014

    Master Gardener

    classes forming

    Interested in becoming a Shelby County Master Gardener? Classes will start in early October and will be held in the evenings at the Shelby County Cooperative Extension office. An informational session that details the cost, class schedule, class and service requirements and more will be held on Monday, Sept. 15 at 6 p.m. at the Extension office, 1117 Frankfort Road. To register for the Master Gardener class information session, call 633-4593.


  • Comer’s first stop, Shelbyville


    Just a little more than a week after announcing his plan to run for governor of Kentucky, Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer started his campaign trail in Shelby County.

    Monday morning, a small crowd of about 30 Shelby County citizens gathered outside of W.J. Andriots Paint, Flooring and Blinds on Main Street in Shelbyville to hear the Republican candidate speak about his vision for Kentucky’s future.

  • WICHE: Crabgrass history reveals multiple uses

    After the big rain we had I hit the weeds – most of which involved wrangling ever-expanding globs of crabgrass. 

    Yes, this is the time when crabgrass rears its ugly head and begins to creep through our fescue lawns, sneak into our cultivated beds and, when we’re not looking, reseeds itself to ensure the continuation of the species. Okay, maybe a little melodramatic but my hands still hurt from all that pulling!  

  • A business as sweet as honey

    There is a serious buzz around the new business of friends and neighbors Dr. George Raque and Steve Smith.

    Over the past five years the two have been working together to build one very sweet business. Raque and Smith are the co-owners of Bee Boys Honey, a quickly growing Shelbyville business.

    Never heard of them? That’s about to change.

    “We just started going after it,” Smith said, explaining that they just began selling their honey commercially over the past year.

  • Shelby senior 4-H team wins state livestock judging competition

    The Shelby County 4-H livestock judging team took first place in the High Senior Team overall honors for the second year in a row at the state 4-H Livestock Judging competition.

  • WICHE: Make sure to harvest vegetables daily

    One day missed in the vegetable garden can mean a big harvest, literally.  All of a sudden, or so it seems, your zucchini is the size of a torpedo and beans are bulging beneath the pod.

    Some vegetables need attention daily; others can be picked every couple of days.  Summer squash and zucchini definitely need to be checked each day because their growth rate is rather fast. 

  • Scholarship winners

    Shelby County Cattlemen’s Association president Irvin Kupper (second left) presents John McKinney, Tyler Goodlett and Matthew Young with $2,500 scholarships at the Cattlemen’s annual picnic in July.

  • Ag report: July 25, 2014

    Kentucky Small Ruminant Profit School

    offered for first time

    The Small Ruminant Profit School (SRPS) is now taking registrations. SRPS is an educational program of four classes over six month for sheep and goat producers that covers topics ranging from breeds, types of operations, facilities/equipment, health management, parasite management, foot care, marketing, genetics & selection, and much more.

    Benefits of SRPS: