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Agriculture

  • Flowers in the showers

    Shelbyville

    Garden and

    Art Show

    WHEN: 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday

    WHERE: Shelby County Cooperative Extension Office, 1117 Frankfort Road

    WHAT: Plants, art, food

    ADMISSION: Free

    Forecasters might be predicting rain but that hasn’t dampened the spirits of the Shelby County Master Gardeners, who said Saturday’s Art and Garden Fair will go on rain or shine.

  • Farmers market kicks off next Saturday

    The return of the Shelby County Farmers’ Market is just a week away and organizers say they are eager to kick off a 14th season.

    Elizabeth Rosenburg, secretary of the farmers’ market, said attendees this year will be treated to some new selections.

    “We have lots of new vendors,” Rosenburg said. “We have a man that raises mushrooms, a pork vendor.”

    In addition, she explained, beef and lamb vendors from previous years will be returning.

  • Fill the jar with veggies

    Lifelong and amateur canners departed the Shelby County Cooperative Extension Office this weekend with some newfound knowledge on the hobby.

    Saturday morning, experienced canners Stephanie Tucker and Wendy Thornbury led a small class of individuals young and old, male and female, all hoping to learn more on the skill.

    From a bushel of freshly picked beans to a jar prepped for storage, participants observed the entire canning process.

    Throughout the procedure, participants were given multiple opportunities to try their hands at canning, as well.

  • Master Gardener Plant Fair
  • Home grown dinner

    About 15 curious Shelby County ladies were in attendance for a Plate it UP! workshop at the Shelby County Cooperative Extension Office Wednesday hoping to learn more about cooking with local produce.

    The free class was made possible through a partnership between the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and the University of Kentucky School of Human Environmental Sciences.

    The statewide program focuses on educating the community about locally grown foods and recipes that utilize them.

  • Backyard farming

    From family-owned local businesses to the Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass, Shelby County has something to offer just about anyone, whether they prefer a small-town life or a big city.   But for those itching for a taste of both worlds, the Shelby County Cooperative Extension Office has them covered, too.

    Starting Thursday, the extension office will begin a workshop series designed for the beginning small farmer with 5 to 20 acres.

  • Diageo connecting with local farms

    Diageo representatives are hosting a meeting Friday for farmers who are interested in using distillery by-products as a feed source for their beef or dairy cattle.

    Details regarding the handling, transportation and cost of the by-product will be discussed.

  • WICHE: Protecting young trees from deer rut

    Last weekend marked the opening of gun season in Kentucky and deer hunters hit the woods in their orange safety gear looking for the epitome of procuring local food! 

    I am not a hunter, but I certainly respect hunters who lawfully hunt for food. While some are hunting this time of the year, however, others are scrambling to protect their trees from the rut.

  • An ode to Jack and the turnip

    It looks like this late turnip crop is going to be a good one thanks to cool temperatures and adequate rain fall. 

    I may even have some little ones ready in honor of Halloween this year, too, even though they will only be salad size.  What does the turnip have to do with Halloween you may ask?  Well, they just may be more authentic than that pumpkin on the porch. 

    Pumpkins have been for sale for weeks and children have decided on costumes but somewhere in the middle of it all is the story of All Hallow’s Eve.  

  • Homegrown goodness

    Nearly a year after the seed was planted, the Rooted in Shelby program is coming to fruition.

    The Shelby County Cooperative Extension launched the program earlier this month with the anticipation of forming a connection with the Shelby County’s Kentucky Proud farmers and local businesses.

    Farmers across the county that participate in the Kentucky Proud program are invited to join Rooted in Shelby, a free program designed for promoting products that are raised or produced in the county.