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Youth

  • Folsom, Ribenboim named National Merit semifinalists

    Matthew K. Folsom and Erica L. Ribenboim, seniors at Collins High School, were among the approximately 16,000 semifinalists in the 57th annual National Merit Scholarship Program.

    They have an opportunity to continue in the competition for some 8,300 National Merit Scholarships worth more than $34 million that will be offered next spring.

  • Shelby students are part of Centre’s largest enrollment

    Shelby County students are part of Centre College's largest-ever first-year class and largest overall enrollment. Academically, more than half were in the top 10 percent of their high school classes, and their average ACT score is nearly 29. Both represent the strongest new-student profile of any Kentucky college or university.

    Those from Shelby County are:

    John Ruble of Bagdad is the son of Wes and Ann Ruble of Bagdad and is a graduate of Shelby County High School.

  • Big planner

    Sydnee Pyles shows off the poster she made to predict her future. Sydnee, a third-grader at Heritage Elementary, joined classmates in making BIG Goals after reading “I Got Big Plans.” Her steps to success are: now, read a lot; five years, study hard as a Shelby County Rocket; 10 years, attend nursing school; 20 years, work at Baptist Hospital Northeast.

  • Hounddogs at Clear Creek

    Children in Jennifer Gilbert’s class at Clear Creek Elementary used their hands as big ears while singing their class song about being hound dogs....because they are always sniffing out ways to learn. The lyrics were to the tune of Elvis Presley’s “You Ain’t Nothin’ But a Hound Dog.” The rock-n-roll singer would have been proud how the children sang but more so because of their literacy and thinking lesson on “metacognition.” Enjoying the music were Principal Karen Downs and Superintendent James Neihof.

  • Back-to-School at Cornerstone

    The Cornerstone annual Back-to-School Picnic was Aug. 26. Families enjoyed a cookout, horseback rides, the playground and outdoor activities.

  • Eruption at Cornerstone

    Michelle Lace’s sixth-grade science class assembled three different volcanoes and watched them erupt earlier this week in science. Students Hunter Lumbatis (left) and Annie Clifton stand back as one erupts in red.

  • Communication skills

    Students in Betty Anderson’s world civilization class discussed back and forth the benefits of the first printing press and what benefits it would have made to the citizens during a time of peace or during a time of war. When asked how they each communicate today, each one responded “texting.”

  • Conservation contest opens

    Writing contest for grades 6-12 and the Jim Claypool Conservation art contest for grades 1-5, is themed “Where Kentucky’s Wild Things Are” for the annual Conservation Writing and Arts Contests sponsored by Kentucky Farm Bureau and the Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts.

    Participants are tasked to share their ideas about the environment around them and efforts they can take to help preserve it, through short essays and artwork, persuading their readers and viewers to take action toward wildlife conservation efforts.

  • First day facts

    All hands were raised to affirm they understood “Level 0” voices as Clear Creek Elementary teacher Eric Miracle prepared his children to go to music class on the first day of school. They toured various areas of the building where they hallway procedures were taught like walking on the right side, holding a bubble of air in your mouth, and keeping arms crossed in front, or in back like a ducktail.

  • First day facts

    All hands were raised to affirm they understood “Level 0” voices as Clear Creek Elementary teacher Eric Miracle prepared his children to go to music class on the first day of school. They toured various areas of the building where they hallway procedures were taught like walking on the right side, holding a bubble of air in your mouth, and keeping arms crossed in front, or in back like a ducktail.