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Today's Features

  • From 1956-1959, Peter Palmer practically lived in the fictional town of Dogpatch as the star of both the Broadway and Hollywood productions of Li’l Abner, based on the popular comic strip that ran from 1934-1977.

    Now, more than 50 years later at the age of 81, Palmer lives in Shelbyville and can most often be found at a different kind of dog patch – the Red Orchard Dog Park.

    “I’m not retired,” Palmer says with a laugh. “The calls just don’t come anymore.”

  • When Walter Herd s retired from the military and returned to Kentucky from Afghanistan in 2007, he noticed a trend that concerned him – few people at home, even his friends, seemed to understand what the military was all about.

    “They learn about soldiers from Hollywood movies,” said Herd, who lives in Simpsonville.

  • When Walter Herd s retired from the military and returned to Kentucky from Afghanistan in 2007, he noticed a trend that concerned him – few people at home, even his friends, seemed to understand what the military was all about.

    “They learn about soldiers from Hollywood movies,” said Herd, who lives in Simpsonville.

  • Imagine a 10-day, all expenses paid trip to Alaska, filled with fishing, hunting, grilling and grizzly bear watching.

    It sounds like the trip of a lifetime, and it was made a reality for nine veterans this summer thanks to one Shelby County resident and his work with the Kentucky Wounded Warriors project.

  • Brenda Woods knew right away that this snake was different.

    While clearing away some brush behind her yard in Fairway Crossing – just south of Interstate 64 at Exit 35 and near Weissinger Hills Golf Course – to construct a play area for her children, Woods and her husband, Shannon, came upon a small snake that just seemed different.

  • “And I asked him why he came to America, and he said because he had always heard the streets were paved with gold!”

    Achille Biagi drew applause as he concluded his narrative of stories about his father to a captive audience of more than 150 relatives who gathered Saturday in a spacious back yard on Magnolia Street for a family reunion in Shelbyville.

    Achille was the coordinator of the event, which was as much of social phenomena in Shelbyville as it was a reunion.

  • One of Shelbyville’s own has hit the international stage.

    Shelbyville native Marissa Raisor, 20, earned the Miss Hooters International crown in a swimsuit competition against 60 other contestants from Hooter restaurants across the country. The pageant was held June 27 at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas and will air on FOX-Speed TV on July 17 at 9 p.m.

  • When a couple of friends took Walt Wagner, 80, to Metzger’s Country Store in Simpsonville to try to convince him to adopt a pet, Wagner said he wasn't sold on the idea. The last time he had owned a pet was decades ago, when his kids were young, and he said he was concerned he wouldn't be able to take proper care of one.

    So he decided to sleep on the idea.

    The next day he decided owning a pet would be good for him. He returned to Metzger's ready to adopt a cat by the named of Cappuccino, also known as “Cappy”.

  • Like most young boys, I enjoyed playing with toy soldiers as a kid. Unlike most young boys, I stuck with it, and turned it into much more than a game of “bang, bang, your guy is dead!” or knocking figures over with marbles.

    Even as a youngster, growing up “down under” in New Zealand, I was a bit of a history nut. I wasn’t quite so interested in the mass destruction potential of warfare as the “why did they do it that way?” And the “how could I have done it better?” problem-solving and strategic study aspects.

  • Like most young boys, I enjoyed playing with toy soldiers as a kid. Unlike most young boys, I stuck with it, and turned it into much more than a game of “bang, bang, your guy is dead!” or knocking figures over with marbles.

    Even as a youngster, growing up “down under” in New Zealand, I was a bit of a history nut. I wasn’t quite so interested in the mass destruction potential of warfare as the “why did they do it that way?” And the “how could I have done it better?” problem-solving and strategic study aspects.