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Today's Features

  • Fannie Miller is an angel, at least according to national adoption officials.

    Though she couldn’t make it to the ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, Miller, a resident of Pleasureville, was among 140 people from all 50 states honored for their work in the adoption process.

    Kathleen Strottman, executive director of the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute, said Miller was chosen for the honor because of her dedication to adoption and positive child welfare practices.

  • Shelbyville native Ruby Lewis is about to embark on her latest venture, co-starring in the national tour of the Queen musical We Will Rock You, which opens later this month.  

    Lewis will play Scaramouche alongside Brian Justin Crum, who was cast in the lead role of Galileo.

  • Shelbyville native Ruby Lewis is about to embark on her latest venture, co-starring in the national tour of the Queen musical We Will Rock You, which opens later this month.  

    Lewis will play Scaramouche alongside Brian Justin Crum, who was cast in the lead role of Galileo.

  • Several weeks ago I had a call from Howard Gibbons of Wind Hill Farm, a Thoroughbred-breeding farm in Shelby County. Having read several of my military columns, he inquired if I had ever served with his uncle, a Navy vice admiral. I had not.

    However, while the Navy, especially in wartime, includes several hundred admirals on its rolls, his inquiry was not unreasonable.

  • The capabilities of the World Wide Web to extend the horizons of research continue to amaze. In writing about the Pacific campaigns of World War II, I described my fellow officer Don Beck as follows:

  • In conducting research for my first book, Kentucky and the Bourbons: The Story of Allen Dale Farm, it was necessary for my wife, Susanne, and me to travel widely. In the United States, we visited Columbia, Tenn., and Nashville, St. Louis, Defiance. Mo., Columbia, Mo., Cumberland Gap and Davie County, N.C. We also made several trips to France to speak to Charette cousins and to visit museums and archives there.

  • Several months before the amphibious assault of Bougainville in November, 1943, by the Third Marine Division, Naval intelligence services had decoded an intercepted message regarding the plans of Admiral Yamamoto to visit three bases near that island. The information provided was so exact that on April 18, 1943, the Army Air Corps’ 339th Fighter Squadron, flying P-38’s based on Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, was able to intercept and destroy Yamamoto’s plane in the air over Bougainville.

  • South Pacific, the next performance at the Shelby County Community Theater, will open on July19. I recall seeing this highly popular musical by Rodgers and Hammerstein on Broadway shortly after its opening in April 1949. Manhattan was an easy subway commute from my duty station at the Naval Training Center on the Throggs Neck Peninsula in the Bronx.

  • Shortly after arriving back at San Pedro in May, 1939, I was detached from the Tennessee and ordered to report to the Marine Corps Base in San Diego. There I joined Company D, the machine gun company of the 1st Battalion, 6th Marines.

    I have been chronicling the early years of a Marine Corps career that began with my commissioning as a second lieutenant in 1937, upon graduation from the University of Washington, including descriptions of the Panama Canal, Bermuda, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Boston and, at some length, New York.

  • My 2-part series has been expanded to four parts. In the first two parts of this narrative, I have described my wonder, as a young Marine second lieutenant, upon visiting the East Coast for the first time.

    Upon my completion of officer training and indoctrination at the Marine Basic School in the Philadelphia Navy Yard in May 1938, I traveled to my next duty station, the USS Tennessee, a battleship then anchored off its home port, San Pedro, Calif.