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Today's Features

  • In conducting research for my first book, Kentucky and the Bourbons: The Story of Allen Dale Farm, it was necessary for my wife, Susanne, and me to travel widely. In the United States, we visited Columbia, Tenn., and Nashville, St. Louis, Defiance. Mo., Columbia, Mo., Cumberland Gap and Davie County, N.C. We also made several trips to France to speak to Charette cousins and to visit museums and archives there.

  • Jeanne Kemper of Bagdad has been so busy cooking and baking for the past month that she has been going nonstop, getting her 45 entries ready to enter in the Kentucky State Fair.

    And as usual, she really cleaned up after all the cooking, earning 33 ribbons in the honey cookery and bread categories – 21 were blue ribbons – as well as the sweepstakes prize for each of those categories.

    But this year – her 28th for competing in the state fair – she said something strange happened that really shocked her.

  • Shelby County trainers, riders, breeders and owners have had a hand in dozens of World Champions during the Kentucky State Fair World’s Championship Horse Show, and on Sunday when the 2013 show begins, county representatives will not only be competing for titles but selecting the winners as well.

    For the fourth time, Kim and Fran Crumpler will step into the show ring as judges for the World’s Championship show. The Crumplers, Kim said, take the judging as an honor.

  • MOUNT EDEN – This 70-year-old pastor cocked his rifle, aimed and missed.

    Undeterred, he cocked it again, aimed and broke into a huge grin when the BB ricocheted off his mailbox on Cat Ridge Road.

    The preacher is Roy “Junie” Temple Jr., who during last week’s 127 Yard Sale bought something he said he had wanted since he was a child but had never purchased: a BB gun.

    To be specific, a Daisy BB gun that he found for sale at one of the churches along U.S. 127 in Franklin County.

    It cost him all of $5.

  • From 1956-1959, Peter Palmer practically lived in the fictional town of Dogpatch as the star of both the Broadway and Hollywood productions of Li’l Abner, based on the popular comic strip that ran from 1934-1977.

    Now, more than 50 years later at the age of 81, Palmer lives in Shelbyville and can most often be found at a different kind of dog patch – the Red Orchard Dog Park.

    “I’m not retired,” Palmer says with a laugh. “The calls just don’t come anymore.”

  • From 1956-1959, Peter Palmer practically lived in the fictional town of Dogpatch as the star of both the Broadway and Hollywood productions of Li’l Abner, based on the popular comic strip that ran from 1934-1977.

    Now, more than 50 years later at the age of 81, Palmer lives in Shelbyville and can most often be found at a different kind of dog patch – the Red Orchard Dog Park.

    “I’m not retired,” Palmer says with a laugh. “The calls just don’t come anymore.”

  • When Walter Herd s retired from the military and returned to Kentucky from Afghanistan in 2007, he noticed a trend that concerned him – few people at home, even his friends, seemed to understand what the military was all about.

    “They learn about soldiers from Hollywood movies,” said Herd, who lives in Simpsonville.

  • When Walter Herd s retired from the military and returned to Kentucky from Afghanistan in 2007, he noticed a trend that concerned him – few people at home, even his friends, seemed to understand what the military was all about.

    “They learn about soldiers from Hollywood movies,” said Herd, who lives in Simpsonville.

  • Imagine a 10-day, all expenses paid trip to Alaska, filled with fishing, hunting, grilling and grizzly bear watching.

    It sounds like the trip of a lifetime, and it was made a reality for nine veterans this summer thanks to one Shelby County resident and his work with the Kentucky Wounded Warriors project.

  • Brenda Woods knew right away that this snake was different.

    While clearing away some brush behind her yard in Fairway Crossing – just south of Interstate 64 at Exit 35 and near Weissinger Hills Golf Course – to construct a play area for her children, Woods and her husband, Shannon, came upon a small snake that just seemed different.