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Today's Features

  • SIMPSONVILLE – The crowd was small Tuesday night at the community Thanksgiving worship service held at Simpsonville Christian Church, but the message was powerful – count your blessings.

    Ric Holladay, minister of Simpsonville United Methodist Church, delivered that message to the 65 or so people who gathered in the candlelit sanctuary as the first snowfall of the year fell gently outside, blanketing the world in white, fluffy arms.

  • After being without a pastor since September 2012, First Baptist Church of Shelbyville, the county’s largest congregation, is preparing has chosen Maurice Hollingsworth as its new minister.
    Hollingsworth comes to Shelbyville from First Baptist Church of Las Cruces, N.M., where he is senior pastor. He replaces Steve Rice, who joined the Kentucky Baptist Convention.

  • A lot of families in Shelby County will gather today for Thanksgiving, enjoying a meal and fellowship and the festivities and traditions that go along with this special day.

    But for one of those families, this will be a lot more than just sitting down to a turkey dinner with all the trimmings.

    Kamron and Megan Terry use the day to introduce their two children, Miles, 5, and Scarlett, 7, adopted from the Republic of Congo in Africa, to American customs, especially at Thanksgiving, has been a blessing in itself.

  • A lot of families in Shelby County will gather today for Thanksgiving, enjoying a meal and fellowship and the festivities and traditions that go along with this special day.

    But for one of those families, this will be a lot more than just sitting down to a turkey dinner with all the trimmings.

    Kamron and Megan Terry use the day to introduce their two children, Miles, 5, and Scarlett, 7, adopted from the Republic of Congo in Africa, to American customs, especially at Thanksgiving, has been a blessing in itself.

  • As we gather around tables to feast on turkey with all the trimmings and give thanks for what’s important in our lives, it just may be that out in the woods behind the house those turkeys that found a way to stay in the wild and avoid the ovens are giving thanks for being dropped back in Shelby County.

    A rural community filled with outdoorsmen, there is no doubt that in this county many of the centerpiece turkeys have been hunted and harvested by someone sitting at that table, but not too long ago that wouldn’t have been possible.

  • Brenda Jackson, known for her decades of representation on the Shelby County Board of Education, is helping ensure that everyone in Shelby County who might not have a Thanksgiving Day meal can find food and company.

    She is the guiding spirit behind the community Thanksgiving Day dinner scheduled for Thursday at Stratton Center, and she may have started a new tradition, Rhonda Gillman said.

  • It would be difficult to find someone as devoted to her community as was Rosella Davis, her friends say.

    “She was always a part of my life, because I grew up with her daughter,” said Sharon Hackworth. “She was involved with Girl Scouts and 4-H, the historical society, so many things. As a person who has given back to their community, she is definitely a model for us all.”

  • This week

    Silversmiths exhibit

    Shelby County Historical Society will have a traveling exhibit of Shelby County silversmiths. The exhibit is currently showing until Dec. 5 at Commonwealth Bank & Trust in Shelbyville. The exhibit moves to Citizens Union Bank on Midland Trail, where it can be viewed Dec. 5-20. There is no charge to view the exhibit.

    Homemakers book club