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Today's Features

  • Shelter employees and volunteers at Tyson’s Chance on Kentucky Street say they’re amazed at the overwhelming response they’ve had from a weekend publicity campaign to help a pit bull mix dog be adopted.

    Whether it will lead to a new home for “Boss Man” is a good question, they said, although at least now he has a chance, thanks to newspaper and television coverage this past weekend.

  • Fannie Miller is an angel, at least according to national adoption officials.

    Though she couldn’t make it to the ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, Miller, a resident of Pleasureville, was among 140 people from all 50 states honored for their work in the adoption process.

    Kathleen Strottman, executive director of the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute, said Miller was chosen for the honor because of her dedication to adoption and positive child welfare practices.

  • Shelbyville native Ruby Lewis is about to embark on her latest venture, co-starring in the national tour of the Queen musical We Will Rock You, which opens later this month.  

    Lewis will play Scaramouche alongside Brian Justin Crum, who was cast in the lead role of Galileo.

  • Shelbyville native Ruby Lewis is about to embark on her latest venture, co-starring in the national tour of the Queen musical We Will Rock You, which opens later this month.  

    Lewis will play Scaramouche alongside Brian Justin Crum, who was cast in the lead role of Galileo.

  • Lisa Tindle Simpson, who grew up in Shelby County but now lives in Northern Kentucky, has published her first book, Crybaby Bridge, based on a Shelby County legend.

    At 5 p.m. Saturday she will be at Sixth and Main Coffeehouse to sign copies.

    Simpson's "urban legend" comes to life in novel form about a woman who was born in 1960 and kills herself and her newborn in 1978 by throwing the baby over the bridge and then jumping in, the water, too.

  • Several weeks ago I had a call from Howard Gibbons of Wind Hill Farm, a Thoroughbred-breeding farm in Shelby County. Having read several of my military columns, he inquired if I had ever served with his uncle, a Navy vice admiral. I had not.

    However, while the Navy, especially in wartime, includes several hundred admirals on its rolls, his inquiry was not unreasonable.

  • When the Long Run Massacre and Floyd’s Defeat re-enactment begins today, it will mark the 15th year of the historical event, and Kathy Cummings has seen each one of them.

    Cummings, who is now the president of the Painted Stone Settlers, Inc., has been with the group since it started.

  • GRAEFENBURG – “It started in a small space, set aside in the basement,” Stephanie Sorrell said.

    Hand-made sets and props were pulled out on Sunday mornings. A handful of parents and church members gathered with the children of Graefenburg Baptist Church to sing a few songs and share a lesson. Hosanna House was launched from humble beginnings.

    “Children and families showed up!” she said. “They had fun. They invited their friends.”

  • The recent disappearance of a small, unremarkable little monument in front of a Simpsonville church has some residents there raising eyebrows – and cain.

    When workers constructing the eastern end of the city’s downtown sidewalk project removed a 3-foot-tall monument that has stood for years in front of Simpsonville Christian Church, phones began to ring around town, particularly that of longtime church member Jake Smith.

  • The capabilities of the World Wide Web to extend the horizons of research continue to amaze. In writing about the Pacific campaigns of World War II, I described my fellow officer Don Beck as follows: