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Today's Features

  • Shelbyville native Ruby Lewis is about to embark on her latest venture, co-starring in the national tour of the Queen musical We Will Rock You, which opens later this month.  

    Lewis will play Scaramouche alongside Brian Justin Crum, who was cast in the lead role of Galileo.

  • Lisa Tindle Simpson, who grew up in Shelby County but now lives in Northern Kentucky, has published her first book, Crybaby Bridge, based on a Shelby County legend.

    At 5 p.m. Saturday she will be at Sixth and Main Coffeehouse to sign copies.

    Simpson's "urban legend" comes to life in novel form about a woman who was born in 1960 and kills herself and her newborn in 1978 by throwing the baby over the bridge and then jumping in, the water, too.

  • Several weeks ago I had a call from Howard Gibbons of Wind Hill Farm, a Thoroughbred-breeding farm in Shelby County. Having read several of my military columns, he inquired if I had ever served with his uncle, a Navy vice admiral. I had not.

    However, while the Navy, especially in wartime, includes several hundred admirals on its rolls, his inquiry was not unreasonable.

  • When the Long Run Massacre and Floyd’s Defeat re-enactment begins today, it will mark the 15th year of the historical event, and Kathy Cummings has seen each one of them.

    Cummings, who is now the president of the Painted Stone Settlers, Inc., has been with the group since it started.

  • GRAEFENBURG – “It started in a small space, set aside in the basement,” Stephanie Sorrell said.

    Hand-made sets and props were pulled out on Sunday mornings. A handful of parents and church members gathered with the children of Graefenburg Baptist Church to sing a few songs and share a lesson. Hosanna House was launched from humble beginnings.

    “Children and families showed up!” she said. “They had fun. They invited their friends.”

  • The recent disappearance of a small, unremarkable little monument in front of a Simpsonville church has some residents there raising eyebrows – and cain.

    When workers constructing the eastern end of the city’s downtown sidewalk project removed a 3-foot-tall monument that has stood for years in front of Simpsonville Christian Church, phones began to ring around town, particularly that of longtime church member Jake Smith.

  • The capabilities of the World Wide Web to extend the horizons of research continue to amaze. In writing about the Pacific campaigns of World War II, I described my fellow officer Don Beck as follows:

  • In conducting research for my first book, Kentucky and the Bourbons: The Story of Allen Dale Farm, it was necessary for my wife, Susanne, and me to travel widely. In the United States, we visited Columbia, Tenn., and Nashville, St. Louis, Defiance. Mo., Columbia, Mo., Cumberland Gap and Davie County, N.C. We also made several trips to France to speak to Charette cousins and to visit museums and archives there.

  • Jeanne Kemper of Bagdad has been so busy cooking and baking for the past month that she has been going nonstop, getting her 45 entries ready to enter in the Kentucky State Fair.

    And as usual, she really cleaned up after all the cooking, earning 33 ribbons in the honey cookery and bread categories – 21 were blue ribbons – as well as the sweepstakes prize for each of those categories.

    But this year – her 28th for competing in the state fair – she said something strange happened that really shocked her.

  • Shelby County trainers, riders, breeders and owners have had a hand in dozens of World Champions during the Kentucky State Fair World’s Championship Horse Show, and on Sunday when the 2013 show begins, county representatives will not only be competing for titles but selecting the winners as well.

    For the fourth time, Kim and Fran Crumpler will step into the show ring as judges for the World’s Championship show. The Crumplers, Kim said, take the judging as an honor.