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Today's Features

  • Joel Kaufman is dying to know just who Elizabeth is.

    “That’s my main question; Just who was Elizabeth and how did she get this name?” he said.

    Elizabeth is a 1938 Ford that resided in Shelby County, originally purchased by Ruth Davis and later given to Don Turner.

    Kaufman, 60, lives in Hickory, N.C., and purchased the car online, and now he wants to tell its story along with returning it to the road.

  • A young man with small children, an elderly woman in a wheelchair and all ages in between – all U.S. military veterans who turned out Sunday for a Veterans Day service at the Shelby County Extension Office.

    They came with their families, and in some instances their families came without them, celebrating veterans who had passed away, such as Bruce Wells, an Army veteran of World War II who, along with his brother, Truman, of Lawrenceburg had received his high school diploma in 2009, when both men were in their 80s.

  • Trims and Whims is as regular as colored leaves in the fall.

    This 33rd annual Christmas crafts fair opens the holiday gift-buying season Saturday and Sunday at Wright Elementary School on Rocket Lane.

  • Shelby County on Saturday will launch its holiday season with the 26th annual Celebration of Lights in Downtown Shelbyville.

    Each year the event, sponsored by the Shelbyville Merchants of Retail Trade (SMART), sparks the holiday spirit and includes lighting the community Christmas tree on Main Street and caroling on the steps of the Shelby County Courthouse.

    Charlene Nation, co-owner of Polka Dotted Pineapple and organizer of the event, said there are a few new things that patrons can expect.

  • When the Bagdad Ruritan Club was founded in 1953 by 26 men, Martha Layne Collins (then Hall) was a just a schoolgirl.

    But as she grew into the first female Governor of Kentucky, she never forgot where she started.

    “My mom always told me never forget your roots,” she told the group assembled at the Bagdad Ruritan Club’s 60th anniversary dinner on Saturday. “I constantly tell people I’m from Bagdad…although sometimes I have to add that it’s the one without the H.”

  • When the Bagdad Ruritan Club was founded in 1953 by 26 men, Martha Layne Collins (then Hall) was a just a schoolgirl.

    But as she grew into the first female Governor of Kentucky, she never forgot where she started.

    “My mom always told me never forget your roots,” she told the group assembled at the Bagdad Ruritan Club’s 60th anniversary dinner on Saturday. “I constantly tell people I’m from Bagdad…although sometimes I have to add that it’s the one without the H.”

  • The previous column has described Dr. Lawrence Jelsma’s medical education, including MD from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1962, followed by internship at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in 1962-63.

    In 1966, in the midst of a 5.5-year residency in neurosurgery, he was drafted into the U. S Army Reserve with the rank of captain in the Medical Corps. In June 1967, he was ordered for duty in South Vietnam, leaving his wife and two children at home.

  • In writing about warfare, there is a general tendency to concentrate on the combat itself, often neglecting to mention the fate of the wounded remaining on the field of battle.

    They are given emergency attention by the courageous medical corpsmen and then evacuated to the rear, by whatever means are available, where severe wounds can be addressed.

  • Donna Meador said she has known Erin Reid for about 21 years, so when she found out that Reid was going to try a new procedure to help her battle with Multiple Sclerosis, she wanted to help.

    Meador has organized a chili supper fundraiser at Centenary United Methodist on Sunday. The event will begin at about 11 a.m., after Sunday school and will continue until after the late-morning worship service, which concludes around noon.

  • Shelbyville’s First Presbyterian Church is on a mission.

    Throughout the month of October, the church is making a special effort to address the needs of almost 300 children in the county who need “A Place To Sleep.” Their program – which has that very name – has helped about 260 children during the five years it has been in existence, but there are still about 30 on the waiting list, in need of help.