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Today's Features

  • Donna Meador said she has known Erin Reid for about 21 years, so when she found out that Reid was going to try a new procedure to help her battle with Multiple Sclerosis, she wanted to help.

    Meador has organized a chili supper fundraiser at Centenary United Methodist on Sunday. The event will begin at about 11 a.m., after Sunday school and will continue until after the late-morning worship service, which concludes around noon.

  • Shelbyville’s First Presbyterian Church is on a mission.

    Throughout the month of October, the church is making a special effort to address the needs of almost 300 children in the county who need “A Place To Sleep.” Their program – which has that very name – has helped about 260 children during the five years it has been in existence, but there are still about 30 on the waiting list, in need of help.

  • On a cold October morning, three months after being frightened by a dog into fleeing for his life, a starving Waddy housecat – weighing only 5 pounds – somewhat miraculously returned home.

    “It was the happiest day of my life; I cried I was so happy to have my kitty back,” 12-year-old Marisa Matlin said.

    She smiled as she recalled the incredible reappearance of her beloved cat, Sheldon, after a long absence during which virtually everyone had given up hope – at least everyone except her.

  • Tiandra Taylor said she hasn’t talked much about her father Fredrick Bolden’s suicide in March of 2010. She said she knows that’s not the right way to handle her pain.

    “You can’t hold stuff in like I have been,” she said. “I never really talked about it – maybe five times.”

  • Shelter employees and volunteers at Tyson’s Chance on Kentucky Street say they’re amazed at the overwhelming response they’ve had from a weekend publicity campaign to help a pit bull mix dog be adopted.

    Whether it will lead to a new home for “Boss Man” is a good question, they said, although at least now he has a chance, thanks to newspaper and television coverage this past weekend.

  • Fannie Miller is an angel, at least according to national adoption officials.

    Though she couldn’t make it to the ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, Miller, a resident of Pleasureville, was among 140 people from all 50 states honored for their work in the adoption process.

    Kathleen Strottman, executive director of the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute, said Miller was chosen for the honor because of her dedication to adoption and positive child welfare practices.

  • Shelbyville native Ruby Lewis is about to embark on her latest venture, co-starring in the national tour of the Queen musical We Will Rock You, which opens later this month.  

    Lewis will play Scaramouche alongside Brian Justin Crum, who was cast in the lead role of Galileo.

  • Shelbyville native Ruby Lewis is about to embark on her latest venture, co-starring in the national tour of the Queen musical We Will Rock You, which opens later this month.  

    Lewis will play Scaramouche alongside Brian Justin Crum, who was cast in the lead role of Galileo.

  • Lisa Tindle Simpson, who grew up in Shelby County but now lives in Northern Kentucky, has published her first book, Crybaby Bridge, based on a Shelby County legend.

    At 5 p.m. Saturday she will be at Sixth and Main Coffeehouse to sign copies.

    Simpson's "urban legend" comes to life in novel form about a woman who was born in 1960 and kills herself and her newborn in 1978 by throwing the baby over the bridge and then jumping in, the water, too.

  • Several weeks ago I had a call from Howard Gibbons of Wind Hill Farm, a Thoroughbred-breeding farm in Shelby County. Having read several of my military columns, he inquired if I had ever served with his uncle, a Navy vice admiral. I had not.

    However, while the Navy, especially in wartime, includes several hundred admirals on its rolls, his inquiry was not unreasonable.