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Today's Features

  • The Sentinel-News, since 2008 has honored at year’s end five Shelby Countians we think have had a significant impact on our community during this year. We sought your nominations on our Facebook page, and we believe each person – or in one case, team – selected for what we call Shelby County’s Fabulous 5 has in his or her own way left an imprint that merits our honoring and emulating, represents a broad spectrum of a diverse society and truly is one of the best of our best.

    Steve Eden

    Mayor of Simpsonville

  • The Sentinel-News, since 2008 has honored at year’s end five Shelby Countians we think have had a significant impact on our community during this year. We sought your nominations on our Facebook page, and we believe each person – or in one case, team – selected for what we call Shelby County’s Fabulous 5 has in his or her own way left an imprint that merits our honoring and emulating, represents a broad spectrum of a diverse society and truly is one of the best of our best.

    Steve Eden

    Mayor of Simpsonville

  • Operation Care next year will expand its women’s center by adding an additional location on Main Street in downtown Shelbyville – for free.

    What’s more, the acquisition of the new building won’t cost Operation Care a dime, with the purchase of a 2-story, 4-plex frame house next door to Bell House Restaurant having been paid by a $125,000 donation from Southeast Christian Church.

  • In my previous column, I described the Cuban Missile Crisis of Oct. 16-28, 1962, when a threatening nuclear disaster was defused by the nerves of steel and the negotiating skills of President John F. Kennedy.

    During this period I was serving as director, Marine Reserve, in U. S Marine Corps headquarters in Arlington, Va., within a mile of the Pentagon, as one of the officers standing the rotating watch as duty general officer in the Marine Corps Command Center. I had been keenly aware of the imminent threat of a nuclear missile striking Washington.

  • In June 1961, while serving as director of the 4th Marine Reserve and Recruitment District based in Philadelphia, I was selected for promotion to the rank of brigadier general. In the Marine Corps promotion is based upon the recommendations of selection boards composed of about seven officers senior in rank to those officers in the selection zone.

  • At a time of year when churches invest so much time and effort into holiday celebrations and draw their biggest attendance, the few members of one of Shelby County’s oldest are their church’s doors are still open.

    Buffalo Lick Baptist, 208 years old this month, is holding on with just 23 members, its pastor said, and it isn’t going anywhere.

  • Walking into the home of Al and Goldie Smith at Christmastime could either be a child’s dream or an adult’s delight, with four large Christmas trees, red and white poinsettias placed throughout the home, and two vases of brilliant green holly with bright red berries on the fireplace mantel.

    “Those aren’t fake. We grow them right here,” Smith said, pointing to the holly.

    The living room contains two of the trees, one of them a stately Christmas tree at the entrance with a smaller, silver Christmas tree at the other end of the room.

  • Walking into the home of Al and Goldie Smith at Christmastime could either be a child’s dream or an adult’s delight, with four large Christmas trees, red and white poinsettias placed throughout the home, and two vases of brilliant green holly with bright red berries on the fireplace mantel.

    “Those aren’t fake. We grow them right here,” Smith said, pointing to the holly.

    The living room contains two of the trees, one of them a stately Christmas tree at the entrance with a smaller, silver Christmas tree at the other end of the room.

  • Brenda Jackson, known for her decades of representation on the Shelby County Board of Education, is helping ensure that everyone in Shelby County who might not have a Thanksgiving Day meal can find food and company.

    She is the guiding spirit behind the community Thanksgiving Day dinner scheduled for Thursday at Stratton Center, and she may have started a new tradition, Rhonda Gillman said.

  • As we gather around tables to feast on turkey with all the trimmings and give thanks for what’s important in our lives, it just may be that out in the woods behind the house those turkeys that found a way to stay in the wild and avoid the ovens are giving thanks for being dropped back in Shelby County.

    A rural community filled with outdoorsmen, there is no doubt that in this county many of the centerpiece turkeys have been hunted and harvested by someone sitting at that table, but not too long ago that wouldn’t have been possible.