.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Included in the Daily New Era in Hopkinsville on March 7, 1908, was this headline:

    “LUCKY FRENCHMAN HAS WON THE LOVE OF GLADYS DEACON”

    “After the Affair of a Smitten Prince and a Duke ‘Turned Down,’ Comes the Triumph of Young Baron de Charette, and Another International Romance Is Launched”

  • For the fourth year in a row, animal lovers turned out in droves to pack Claudia Sanders Dinner House to raise money for animals.

    “Are we sold out – are you kidding?” said Kate Raisor, glancing around at the horde of 350-plus patrons, mostly decked out in various hues of red, pink and black, milling around the banquet room Friday night.

  • For the fourth year in a row, animal lovers turned out in droves to pack Claudia Sanders Dinner House to raise money for animals.

    “Are we sold out – are you kidding?” said Kate Raisor, glancing around at the horde of 350-plus patrons, mostly decked out in various hues of red, pink and black, milling around the banquet room Friday night.

  • Shelby County’s animal welfare workers and volunteers will be celebrating this evening at the Claudia Sanders Dinner House – but they also will be focusing on a big job ahead.

    The event is the fourth Monarchs, Mutts and Meows dinner dance fundraiser, with proceeds being shared by the five county organizations that work to rescue stray or deserted animals and find them new homes.

    The good news is that the event has been so well supported. Tickets have already sold out.

  • From the time she saw the house, Pat Hornback knew, she said, that it was something that would be perfect, but that took some convincing.

    “I wanted to run a bulldozer through it, but she didn’t,” said her husband, Paul Hornback. “Pat is very good at looking at something and being able to see what it will look like when it’s finished. I couldn’t see it, but she knew it was going to be something special.”

  • From the time she saw the house, Pat Hornback knew, she said, that it was something that would be perfect, but that took some convincing.

    “I wanted to run a bulldozer through it, but she didn’t,” said her husband, Paul Hornback. “Pat is very good at looking at something and being able to see what it will look like when it’s finished. I couldn’t see it, but she knew it was going to be something special.”

  • In my previous column I described my responsibilities as commanding general of the Landing Force Training Unit, Pacific, with my offices in Coronado Calif., and my quarters in San Diego.

    My mission here was to provide teams of Marines to train our allies throughout the Far East in the Marine Corps’ specialty: amphibious operations.

    During Oct. 9-25, 1965, I took my third trip to the Far East to inspect my deployed instructional teams. Marine battalions had landed in Vietnam by this time and were engaged with the Viet Cong.

  • My last column described my duties and experiences as national director of the Marine Corps Reserve. While stationed at Marine Headquarters in Washington D.C., I traveled widely in the United States to inspect my reserve units.

    In March 1964, I was transferred across the country to Coronado, Calif., to assume command of the Landing Force Training Unit, Pacific. My mission here was to provide teams of Marines to train our allies throughout the Far East in the Marine Corps’ specialty: amphibious operations.

  • In recent months I have watched a few recorded episodes of the first three seasons of Downton Abbey, a British drama about a family trying to hold onto a castle and to their entitled place in British high society.

    Doing this has been treating my withdrawal pains last winter from the tragic ending of Season Three. It has also gotten me ready for the first installment of Season Four. To whet their appetites, fellow Downton fans may enjoy some of my thoughts about our favorite dramatic series.

  • Christmas came early for Clay Village resident Roy Butler, whom many call the “Father of Medicaid” in Kentucky.

    In the fall, he was inducted into the University of Kentucky College of Public Health Hall of Fame, which

    recognizes individuals who “made exceptional contributions to the health and welfare of the citizens of the commonwealth, the nation and/or the world,” according to a press release.