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Today's Features

  • From the time she saw the house, Pat Hornback knew, she said, that it was something that would be perfect, but that took some convincing.

    “I wanted to run a bulldozer through it, but she didn’t,” said her husband, Paul Hornback. “Pat is very good at looking at something and being able to see what it will look like when it’s finished. I couldn’t see it, but she knew it was going to be something special.”

  • In my previous column I described my responsibilities as commanding general of the Landing Force Training Unit, Pacific, with my offices in Coronado Calif., and my quarters in San Diego.

    My mission here was to provide teams of Marines to train our allies throughout the Far East in the Marine Corps’ specialty: amphibious operations.

    During Oct. 9-25, 1965, I took my third trip to the Far East to inspect my deployed instructional teams. Marine battalions had landed in Vietnam by this time and were engaged with the Viet Cong.

  • My last column described my duties and experiences as national director of the Marine Corps Reserve. While stationed at Marine Headquarters in Washington D.C., I traveled widely in the United States to inspect my reserve units.

    In March 1964, I was transferred across the country to Coronado, Calif., to assume command of the Landing Force Training Unit, Pacific. My mission here was to provide teams of Marines to train our allies throughout the Far East in the Marine Corps’ specialty: amphibious operations.

  • In recent months I have watched a few recorded episodes of the first three seasons of Downton Abbey, a British drama about a family trying to hold onto a castle and to their entitled place in British high society.

    Doing this has been treating my withdrawal pains last winter from the tragic ending of Season Three. It has also gotten me ready for the first installment of Season Four. To whet their appetites, fellow Downton fans may enjoy some of my thoughts about our favorite dramatic series.

  • Christmas came early for Clay Village resident Roy Butler, whom many call the “Father of Medicaid” in Kentucky.

    In the fall, he was inducted into the University of Kentucky College of Public Health Hall of Fame, which

    recognizes individuals who “made exceptional contributions to the health and welfare of the citizens of the commonwealth, the nation and/or the world,” according to a press release.

  • The Sentinel-News, since 2008 has honored at year’s end five Shelby Countians we think have had a significant impact on our community during this year. We sought your nominations on our Facebook page, and we believe each person – or in one case, team – selected for what we call Shelby County’s Fabulous 5 has in his or her own way left an imprint that merits our honoring and emulating, represents a broad spectrum of a diverse society and truly is one of the best of our best.

    Steve Eden

    Mayor of Simpsonville

  • The Sentinel-News, since 2008 has honored at year’s end five Shelby Countians we think have had a significant impact on our community during this year. We sought your nominations on our Facebook page, and we believe each person – or in one case, team – selected for what we call Shelby County’s Fabulous 5 has in his or her own way left an imprint that merits our honoring and emulating, represents a broad spectrum of a diverse society and truly is one of the best of our best.

    Steve Eden

    Mayor of Simpsonville

  • Operation Care next year will expand its women’s center by adding an additional location on Main Street in downtown Shelbyville – for free.

    What’s more, the acquisition of the new building won’t cost Operation Care a dime, with the purchase of a 2-story, 4-plex frame house next door to Bell House Restaurant having been paid by a $125,000 donation from Southeast Christian Church.

  • In my previous column, I described the Cuban Missile Crisis of Oct. 16-28, 1962, when a threatening nuclear disaster was defused by the nerves of steel and the negotiating skills of President John F. Kennedy.

    During this period I was serving as director, Marine Reserve, in U. S Marine Corps headquarters in Arlington, Va., within a mile of the Pentagon, as one of the officers standing the rotating watch as duty general officer in the Marine Corps Command Center. I had been keenly aware of the imminent threat of a nuclear missile striking Washington.

  • In June 1961, while serving as director of the 4th Marine Reserve and Recruitment District based in Philadelphia, I was selected for promotion to the rank of brigadier general. In the Marine Corps promotion is based upon the recommendations of selection boards composed of about seven officers senior in rank to those officers in the selection zone.