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Today's Features

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    Starting seeds indoors turns out to be a necessary skill if you want success with some crops.

    A few need a bit of a head start in order to reach maturity at the right time for Kentuckiana gardens.  Other considerations include ideal growing conditions.

    Cabbage, for example, can be started early so you can set them out as plants as soon as possible.  The goal is to get an early harvest before our summer temperatures soar and the plants bolt and get bitter.  

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

     

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

  • February is noted for the observance of history, most notably pertaining to American presidents and African-American history.

    Of course, Valentine's Day falls smack in the middle of the month, but that is very appropriate. Because that is a holiday reserved for love, and most historians are in love with the past.

    Or, more appropriately, they are in love with how the past has shaped our future.

    And some of those in love with history have publicly displayed their affection.

  • Local residents with an annual income of less than $40,000 can get free tax preparation – if their returns aren’t too complicated.

    The program, which is being sponsored by Metro United Way, offers residents of Shelby and Oldham County free tax preparation by IRS-certified volunteers. It is available to any family with a household income less than $40,000 or any individual who makes less than $15,000.

  • Inspiration sometimes comes from an insult.

    One of Joseph “Austin” Shirley-Dean's classmates several years ago told him he couldn't dance. That comment got him started on the road to the title 2009 Teen Mister Dance of the Bluegrass, an honor he picked up last weekend in Ashland. This summer he will compete in Washington, D. C. for the national title.

  • There were few things that made my dad cringe more than the practice of topping trees.  He would scratch his brow and shake his head at the thought of homeowners paying to have their trees butchered.

    It was slightly less offensive if utility companies butchered trees because it could be rationalized:  downed limbs create a hazard and cause power outages, which can cause more then just unhappy customers, as we have seen over the curse of the last 6 months.

  • The Shelby County Community Theatre (SCCT) is inviting people to come in after a hard week's work, sit back, relax and listen to others sing about "Working".

    Adapted by Stephen Schwartz and Nina Faso from the same-titled book by Studs Terkel, "Working" is a musical about the common man - and woman.

    Developed from real interviews with a variety of workers - from cleaning women to bricklayers -- the show offers monologues of 26 average American workers as they share their work experiences and deepest dreams.

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.  

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

  • Another championed cause that took years to gain the attention it needed began with Bob Fay sending me down an alley in Shelbyville that he said deserved a photo page. What I saw in the short drive down the alley, unknown to most residents along Main Street, brought me to tears.

    Houses  with front doors resting on rusted hinges and leaving a gap at the top and bottom were crumbling to the ground. Old men sitting on porches that had holes in the floor with weeds growing through them waved shyly as I passed.

  • Rob Rothenburger was adamant, clacking his spaghetti tongs together as he spoke.

    “No, no, I can't give up Mama Rothenburger's secret family chili recipe. But I will tell you this,” he said, leaning forward and glancing at the other contestant at the chili cook-off with a mischievous gleam in his eye, “this guy's secret ingredient is road kill!”

    After a chuckle as hearty as his chili, Shelby County’s Judge Executive excused himself to turn his attention to a question posed by a diner.