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Today's Features

  • There were few things that made my dad cringe more than the practice of topping trees.  He would scratch his brow and shake his head at the thought of homeowners paying to have their trees butchered.

    It was slightly less offensive if utility companies butchered trees because it could be rationalized:  downed limbs create a hazard and cause power outages, which can cause more then just unhappy customers, as we have seen over the curse of the last 6 months.

  • The Shelby County Community Theatre (SCCT) is inviting people to come in after a hard week's work, sit back, relax and listen to others sing about "Working".

    Adapted by Stephen Schwartz and Nina Faso from the same-titled book by Studs Terkel, "Working" is a musical about the common man - and woman.

    Developed from real interviews with a variety of workers - from cleaning women to bricklayers -- the show offers monologues of 26 average American workers as they share their work experiences and deepest dreams.

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.  

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

  • Another championed cause that took years to gain the attention it needed began with Bob Fay sending me down an alley in Shelbyville that he said deserved a photo page. What I saw in the short drive down the alley, unknown to most residents along Main Street, brought me to tears.

    Houses  with front doors resting on rusted hinges and leaving a gap at the top and bottom were crumbling to the ground. Old men sitting on porches that had holes in the floor with weeds growing through them waved shyly as I passed.

  • Rob Rothenburger was adamant, clacking his spaghetti tongs together as he spoke.

    “No, no, I can't give up Mama Rothenburger's secret family chili recipe. But I will tell you this,” he said, leaning forward and glancing at the other contestant at the chili cook-off with a mischievous gleam in his eye, “this guy's secret ingredient is road kill!”

    After a chuckle as hearty as his chili, Shelby County’s Judge Executive excused himself to turn his attention to a question posed by a diner.

  • We often speak of unsung heroes whose acts of kindness or courage, strokes of genius or divine luck, words of inspiration or encouragement; leave their mark on an individual or even a community. In an era when respect for people of the media is at an unprecedented and unfortunate low, there is one former publisher/editor whose good works even now, over 35 years after his retirement from journalism and departure from Shelby County, benefit our community.

    I recently learned that Robert A.

  • A few weeks after the publication of last year's column about Clarence Miller, I visited him again in Shelbyville.

    With considerable pleasure, he showed me a framed copy of my column that had been entered into the Congressional Record by Sen. Mitch McConnell, who had sent it to him personally with a warm note of appreciation.

    During the course of our conversation, Clarence described some of his experiences while in government service.

  •  Two weeks ago I asked, “What more, Mother Nature?”  Well, another gusty wind storm was served up adding to the collection of debris left by the ice storm.

    Some serious questions are coming in about what to take out and what to try and save.  I am not a certified arborist, but I can pass on the guidelines that certified arborists are taught when it comes to tree assessment and risk management.  These criteria may help you decide what to do now and in the future.

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.  

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

  • Hidden deep in the Andes Mountains, situated in a crater beneath man-made Lake Ingenuity, and alive inside the minds of three East Middle School students, lies a futuristic oasis.

    The imagined city of Edistyminen was designed for the early 2100s to shelter people from the ravages of a 22nd-century war that was set in motion by a cessation in oil production.

    Some of the world's brightest minds created a city that could stay hidden from the violence around it while sustaining itself with clean water, wind and waste energy.