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Today's Features

  • From a country doctor who carried his medicine in his bag to an inspirational community leader, Dr. Donald Chatham spent more than half a century tending to the physical, spiritual and professional needs of a broad spectrum of people in Shelby County and around the world.

    Revered as a man of kindness, generosity and dedication to his profession, his community and his family, Chatham died Tuesday afternoon at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville after a long battle with a variety of health problems. He was 82.

  •   Students in Amanda Dungan’s third-grade class have spent the last few weeks learning about the costs and benefits of creating art.

    Dungan and fellow Southside Elementary School teacher Krista Armes combined lessons on economics and painting in order to create an engaging learning experience for their students.

    This classroom activity had additional significance for the students because after the paintings are completed, they would be sold, and the proceeds would help provide food for needy children in the community.

  • When she first was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2005, Toni Ethington Roberts said she did what many of us would do: She went to the bookstores for help.

    She read and read, but none of the most popular self-help books seemed to shed light on the long, dark tunnel into which she was staring, so she said she decided to do something most people can’t do: She wrote her own story.

  • Slumdog Millionaire

    5 out of 5 stars

    Director: Danny Boyle

    Starring: Dev Patel, Irrfan Khan, Anil Kapoor, Madhur Mittal, Freida Pinto

    Rated: R for some violence, disturbing images and language.

    Released: Nov. 12, 2008 (Limited); Wider re-release is in the works

    Running time: 2 hours

     Slumdog Millionaire shows you don't need money to be rich.

  •  

    Starting seeds indoors turns out to be a necessary skill if you want success with some crops.

    A few need a bit of a head start in order to reach maturity at the right time for Kentuckiana gardens.  Other considerations include ideal growing conditions.

    Cabbage, for example, can be started early so you can set them out as plants as soon as possible.  The goal is to get an early harvest before our summer temperatures soar and the plants bolt and get bitter.  

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

     

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

  • February is noted for the observance of history, most notably pertaining to American presidents and African-American history.

    Of course, Valentine's Day falls smack in the middle of the month, but that is very appropriate. Because that is a holiday reserved for love, and most historians are in love with the past.

    Or, more appropriately, they are in love with how the past has shaped our future.

    And some of those in love with history have publicly displayed their affection.

  • Local residents with an annual income of less than $40,000 can get free tax preparation – if their returns aren’t too complicated.

    The program, which is being sponsored by Metro United Way, offers residents of Shelby and Oldham County free tax preparation by IRS-certified volunteers. It is available to any family with a household income less than $40,000 or any individual who makes less than $15,000.

  • Inspiration sometimes comes from an insult.

    One of Joseph “Austin” Shirley-Dean's classmates several years ago told him he couldn't dance. That comment got him started on the road to the title 2009 Teen Mister Dance of the Bluegrass, an honor he picked up last weekend in Ashland. This summer he will compete in Washington, D. C. for the national title.

  • There were few things that made my dad cringe more than the practice of topping trees.  He would scratch his brow and shake his head at the thought of homeowners paying to have their trees butchered.

    It was slightly less offensive if utility companies butchered trees because it could be rationalized:  downed limbs create a hazard and cause power outages, which can cause more then just unhappy customers, as we have seen over the curse of the last 6 months.