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Today's Features

  • Suebeth Newton's blond ponytail nearly reaches the ground as she bends over to strap on her long chaps and spurs. This 16-year-old smiles at the people around her, but she casts a nervous glance at the empty ring over her shoulder.

    Newton's boyfriend, Tyler Chesser, tapes the wrist of a leather glove on her right hand. Then she grabs her helmet and the black vest with "Cowgirl Up!" written on the back. She makes her way through ankle-deep mud to the holding pen containing a bull named Monsoon.

  • Magistrate Betty Curtsinger is very excited about Clay Village’s first festival ever, coming up this Friday and Saturday.

    “I have pushed for this for the last 15 years,” she said. “The people here have worked very hard for this, and I’m so proud of them,” she said of her friends and neighbors.

    The Clay Village October Fest will kick off at 5 p.m. Friday with several bands, followed by a pig roast at 5:30 at the former Henry Clay School.

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    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

  • Her hair is long and flowing and Baby Boomers would take one look at her 1960s bell bottoms and love beads and call her a hippie.

    But there’s no doubt about it, Elizabeth is a real doll.

    Literally.

    Nine women who attended Patti Medaris Culea’s “Create a cloth doll” workshop this past weekend at a local craft shop, patterned their dolls after “Elizabeth,” created by the instructor,  Culea.

  • Louisville musician Patrick Henry Hughes, whose battles in life have inspired many, will be the guest speaker for A Loving Choice Pregnancy Resource Center's annual benefit banquet at the Claudia Sanders Dinner House on Thursday night.

    Hughes’ story is one of success in the face of overwhelming obstacles, one that has drawn national attention.

    Now a senior at the University of Louisville, he was born without eyes and without the ability to straighten his arms or legs.

  • Several thousand cyclists will ride through Shelby County this weekend, braving a strong chance of rain, wipeouts and enough flying insects to make them "look like the grill of a Mack truck," as rider Dan Mutterer put it.

    Mutterer is one of several Shelby County residents participating in The Ride to Conquer Cancer benefiting the Norton Cancer Institute. The Ride is a two-day, 150-mile journey from Louisville to Lexington and back.

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  • If you’ve ever wondered why so many people spoil their children, it’s simple.  They get two big payoffs.

    First, the obvious: it’s easier just to get through the moment by indulging children’s demands, rather than stopping to teach them a lesson. And the more subtle reason is that by living for and through the child, they can avoid all their own feelings, issues and responsibilities. It’s like a drug—a pain-killing escape from reality.

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    Too many cooks sure didn't spoil the broth Monday night, with delicious food, sparkling spirits, a great jazz band, door prizes and even cornhole.

    Add to that a thoroughly mellow crowd, and you have the makings a great evening.

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos.