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Today's Features

  • A new carpet was laid Wednesday night in the Chapel at the Church of the Annunciation. The building and maintenance committee may need to check into the warranty of this carpet, because it will only last a week.

    The “alfombra,” made of sawdust and sometimes other organic materials such as flower petals, rice or dried herbs, is a centuries-old tradition from Guatemala.

  • Dorothy Spaulding Gordon, known affectionately around the county as simply "Dottie," died Wednesday at the Masonic Home Shelbyville. She was 93.

    Since 1940 she has owned and operated a hair salon called Dottie's Beauty Shop at 415 6th Street in Shelbyville. The familiar marquee remains on the building.

  • They stood, noses quivering with excitement, waiting for the signal to take off.

    No, it wasn’t opening day at Keeneland, but any throughbred would have been hard pressed to keep up with the dozens of squealing, laughing children who sprinted away eagerly in search of Easter eggs.

  • "Just as the sun comes up, you can hear the birds singing, and it's very peaceful and beautiful," said Allen Clark, minister of music and education at Highland Baptist Church.

    Allen was remembering Easter sunrise services he attended for years at the church.

    "We would move ours around, and a couple of times we had them in the park at Colonel Sanders Pavilion," he said.

    Highland Baptist no longer holds sunrise services, he said, because they discontinued them when they started to hold two worship services on Sunday instead of just one.

  • Isaac Shelby, the first governor of Kentucky and the namesake for Shelby County and its county seat, will be the subject of a one-man living history presentation Thursday.

    The Painted Stone Settlers, Inc. will host history interpreter Mel Hankla as he brings Shelby to life at 7 p.m. at the Stratton Center in Shelbyville.

    The show is free and open to the public.

  • On June 11, 1784, Nicholas Meriwether returned to Louisville with his family.  On Aug. 7 he wrote a lengthy and enlightening letter to his father-in-law, Captain Meriwether, describing in subdued terms his trip down the river:

    “An agreeable passage of seventeen days, the water being very low.”

    After discussing arrangements for the purchase of boats, he strongly recommended:

  • Everybody loves a birthday party, and that’s why the city and county are inviting everybody to Clear Creek Park to help the Family Activity Center celebrate its 10th anniversary Thursday.

    And it looks like the spring weather is arriving just in time.

    The forecast is clear and sunny for Thursday, high of 81, perfect for the park’s plans.

  • Tuesday was the last day to file for election for the May Primary, and numerous last-minute candidates filed their paperwork with the county clerk's office.

    A huge slate of candidates already has entered the race for the U.S. Senate seat held by retiring Republican Jim Bunning, and U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie (R-Bowling Green) picked up some competition for his seat in District 2, which includes Shelby County.

    Six Republicans and five Democrats will vie for Bunning’s slot, and Democrat Ed Marksberry of Owensboro has filed to face Guthrie.

  • Despite a sparse crowd, the candidates for the 20th District State Senate seat were ready and willing to go at the Tuesday's Kentucky Farm Bureau forum at the Stratton Center.

    All four candidates - Republicans David Glauber, Bullitt County, and Paul Hornback, Shelby County, and Democrats David Eaton, Shelby, and John Spainhour, Bullitt – turned out to define their positions on topics ranging from agriculture to education and from taxes to infrastructure.

  • When we last left this story, Megan Terry of Simpsonville was embarking on a journey that few of us will experience.

    She was headed to the war-torn Congo in southern Africa, where there are more than 5 million orphans and where 400 kids die each day from malaria.