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Today's Features

  • Nicholas Meriwether’s dispute with Daniel M'Cleland's about legal proceedings and land dealings in Shelby County did not end with Meriwether’s lengthy letter to the Kentucky Gazette.

    About two weeks later, M’Cleland got in his response.

    He wrote:

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    The Slaughter memorial site just west of Simpsonville has received a $1,000 grant from the Louisville Civil War Roundtable to place memorials to each of the 22 members in Company E of the 5th U.S. Colored Calvary who died at that site on Jan. 25, 1865.

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

     

  • Internationally known mystery writer, Sue Grafton will speak at the Shelby County Public Library at 6 p.m. Thursday as part of the nationwide One Book, One Community program.

    Friends of the Library in Shelbyville have purchased 250 copies of J is for Judgment by Grafton to be distributed free to the community. They can be obtained by contacting the library, but only a few remain.

  • A new carpet was laid Wednesday night in the Chapel at the Church of the Annunciation. The building and maintenance committee may need to check into the warranty of this carpet, because it will only last a week.

    The “alfombra,” made of sawdust and sometimes other organic materials such as flower petals, rice or dried herbs, is a centuries-old tradition from Guatemala.

  • Dorothy Spaulding Gordon, known affectionately around the county as simply "Dottie," died Wednesday at the Masonic Home Shelbyville. She was 93.

    Since 1940 she has owned and operated a hair salon called Dottie's Beauty Shop at 415 6th Street in Shelbyville. The familiar marquee remains on the building.

  • They stood, noses quivering with excitement, waiting for the signal to take off.

    No, it wasn’t opening day at Keeneland, but any throughbred would have been hard pressed to keep up with the dozens of squealing, laughing children who sprinted away eagerly in search of Easter eggs.

  • "Just as the sun comes up, you can hear the birds singing, and it's very peaceful and beautiful," said Allen Clark, minister of music and education at Highland Baptist Church.

    Allen was remembering Easter sunrise services he attended for years at the church.

    "We would move ours around, and a couple of times we had them in the park at Colonel Sanders Pavilion," he said.

    Highland Baptist no longer holds sunrise services, he said, because they discontinued them when they started to hold two worship services on Sunday instead of just one.

  • Isaac Shelby, the first governor of Kentucky and the namesake for Shelby County and its county seat, will be the subject of a one-man living history presentation Thursday.

    The Painted Stone Settlers, Inc. will host history interpreter Mel Hankla as he brings Shelby to life at 7 p.m. at the Stratton Center in Shelbyville.

    The show is free and open to the public.