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Today's Features

  • We have explored the life of Squire Boone, brother of Daniel and one of the original settlers of what today is Shelby County. We have followed him from North Carolina, across the state and into Indiana, where he died.

    To understand that life, we have to decipher his legacy, one mostly built on name – the Boone name and the landmark he created for his land holdings in what would become Shelby County, Painted Stone.

  • Having been born and raised in Shelbyville, city council member Alan Matthews has seen the city grow.

    He attended Shelbyville High School and has seen the small town expand past its old borders of Main and Washington streets.

    Now, as he runs for his fifth term on city council, he wants to remain a vital part of the city’s decision making.

  • Magistrate Tony Carriss said he remains excited about "all the good things that create Shelby County's uniqueness" as he files for his sixth term as magistrate.

    Among what he calls those special things are the great services that county government provides, he said.

    "We are very proud that each of our county services continues to improve each year while at the same time our tax rate for Shelby County government has continued to reduce.

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    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

  • Mike Zoeller has spent the last six years on the Shelbyville City Council, and he's not ready to stop just yet.

    Zoeller, an assistant principal at Shelby County High School, has filed for a fourth term.

    He has been on the city's finance committee for his full tenure on the council and said he believes the city is in good shape.

    "The city of Shelbyville is in good financial shape because of proper planning and fiscal management," he said.

    Zoeller linked that success to the city's aggressive commitment to safety.

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

  • If your Christmas shopping list still contains a few stubborn names at this 11th hour, it is probably because these friends or family members are tough to choose for.

    They may either have everything or be a bit picky, leaving you, the well-intentioned giver, with the challenge of coming up with a creative gift they'll enjoy.

  • Republican Tim Willard has filed to run for constable in District 2, which encompasses Persimmon Ridge, Todds Point, Long Run Road and Simpsonville.

    Willard has worked at Roll Forming for 32 years, where he is a master roll operator.

    He is a former volunteer fire fighter of nine years, an EMT of eight years and former special deputy sheriff for one year.

  • Maurice M. Sweeney says he's a farmer and businessman, not a politician.

    But this Jefferson County resident with long ties to Shelby County has announced he's running for the U.S. Senate seat currently occupied by Jim Bunning in the 2010 elections.

    Sweeney, a Democrat, said growing up on a 324-acre farm with tobacco and cattle just outside the Shelby County border meant he's done a lot of business in the county over the years.

    Now he wants to use what he learned on that farm to serve Kentuckians.