.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • 0 0

  • George Best said he liked his first turn on the Shelbyville City Council so much he’s decided to run again.

    Best filed his papers to run for a second term this year, and he’s hoping to help lead the city into the new decade.

    Best said, like all cities, finding revenue will be key.

    “How do we get more revenue without increasing taxes?” he asked. “And how do we increase our services with out raising taxes? Those are the biggest questions we’ll face. There are several ways it can be done.”

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

  • In 2009, Shelby Countians faced significant issues that affected their lives and their futures. Many stepped forward to lead, to create and the minister. Here are the stories of five whose special accomplishments were exemplary for the bygone year.

    Bobby Hudson, President and CEO of the Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation, was instrumental in an effort that almost brought Harley-Davidson to our hometown.

  • Incumbent Shelby County Magistrate Betty Curtsinger has announced that she will be seeking a fourth term as a Shelby County 5th District magistrate.  “With the overwhelming urging of citizens residing in the 5th District, and my passion for serving the people of Shelby County, I will seek a fourth term as a member of the Shelby County Fiscal Court,” Curtsinger said. Curtsinger, a Democrat, said she is proud of the many undertakings that she and the Fiscal Court have collectively been able to accomplish by working for the betterment of Shelby Cou

  • Former Shelbyville Police Chief Stewart Shirley has filed to run as a Republican candidate for Shelby County Sheriff.

    Sheriff Mike Armstrong, a Democrat, has filed to run for re-election.

  • We have explored the life of Squire Boone, brother of Daniel and one of the original settlers of what today is Shelby County. We have followed him from North Carolina, across the state and into Indiana, where he died.

    To understand that life, we have to decipher his legacy, one mostly built on name – the Boone name and the landmark he created for his land holdings in what would become Shelby County, Painted Stone.

  • Having been born and raised in Shelbyville, city council member Alan Matthews has seen the city grow.

    He attended Shelbyville High School and has seen the small town expand past its old borders of Main and Washington streets.

    Now, as he runs for his fifth term on city council, he wants to remain a vital part of the city’s decision making.

  • Magistrate Tony Carriss said he remains excited about "all the good things that create Shelby County's uniqueness" as he files for his sixth term as magistrate.

    Among what he calls those special things are the great services that county government provides, he said.

    "We are very proud that each of our county services continues to improve each year while at the same time our tax rate for Shelby County government has continued to reduce.

  •   0 0 0