.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Public meetings
    The Housing Authority of Shelbyville Board of Commissioners meets at 5:30 p.m. today at the Housing Authority Administrative/Community Building.
    Shelby County High School’s SBDM meeting 3:30 p.m. Wednesday.
    Shelbyville City Council meets at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at City Hall, 315 Washington St.
    Shelby County Board of Education meets at 7 p.m. Thursday at the central office on Main Street in Shelbyville.
    Board of Adjustments and Appeals meets at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Stratton Center.

  • The name Vintage Voodoo invokes old-world charm in New Orleans, back alleys and dark streets.

    But the Shelbyville-based band - consisting of guitarist Michael Whisman, lead singer Rick Willard, drummer Patrick Jacobs, guitarist Bobby Hardaway and bassist Greg Viergutz, the only member not from Shelbyville - said that's not quite the case.

    "Vintage Magic just didn't sound right. There's really nothing voodoo about us, but it's vintage because we're all old," Whisman said laughing.

  • The name Vintage Voodoo invokes old-world charm in New Orleans, back alleys and dark streets.

    But the Shelbyville-based band - consisting of guitarist Michael Whisman, lead singer Rick Willard, drummer Patrick Jacobs, guitarist Bobby Hardaway and bassist Greg Viergutz, the only member not from Shelbyville - said that's not quite the case.

    "Vintage Magic just didn't sound right. There's really nothing voodoo about us, but it's vintage because we're all old," Whisman said laughing.

  • Chelsea and Sam Eppehimer were married Sunday, June 12, 2011.

    Parents of the bride are Dale and Rhonda Jones of Simpsonville. The groom is the son of Bill and Lori Eppehimer of Simpsonville.

    Steve Boyd officiated the double-ring ceremony.

    The bride was given in marriage by her father.

    Honor attendant was Katie Reese of Simpsonville, cousin of the bride.

    Bridesmaids were Ashley Boyd, Ashley Standafer, Ashley Glassner and Abby Thurman.

    Best man was Bill Eppehimer of Simpsonville.

  • Several 4-generations of the Kemper/Perkins family reunion gathered at the home of Wanda Kemper Perkins (seated fourth from left) and Bill Perkins (standing third from left, front row) on Aug. 6, 2011, in Shelbyville.

  • Dawn J. and Mike L. Harrod of Shelbyville announce the birth of their fourth child, third son, Reece James Harrod, on Tuesday, July 26, 2011 at Baptist Hospital East, Louisville. Grandparents are Marsha Puckett James, and Kitty and Horace Harrod, all of Shelbyville.

  • Josh and Bree Case of Shelbyville announce the birth of their first child, a son, on July 16, 2011 at Baptist East Hospital. He has been named Brayden Michael Case.

    Grandparents are Garry Bruce, Mike and Debbie Case, all of Shelbyville, and the late Nancy Bruce).

    Great-grandparents are Betsy McClain and Sara Adams, both of Shelbyville; Jessie and Pat Bruce of Deford, Mich., and Dwayne and Mary Lou Fischer of Bay City, Mich.

  • “I had no idea, I can tell you I was just completely bowled over.”
    Those are the words  of Shelby County Attorney Hart Megibben, who Thursday was named 2011 Outstanding County Attorney by the office of the state attorney general.

    Megibben, accompanied by his family, attended the Prosecutor’s Conference in Louisville, where the award was announced. Two recipients are chosen each year, and the other was John Estill of Mason County.

    Megibben said he never expected to receive such an award and that was very honored.

  • Ever hear of a time-traveling farmer?
    That’s the plot of Shelby County resident William Greer’s first book, which was published two weeks ago.

    Greer also has another book coming out soon, a nonfiction work, based on his true-life experiences in Vietnam.

    What’s more, he has a third book that was recently accepted by his publisher.

    Believe it or not, there is something even more amazing than a novice writer having three books accepted and published all in the same year.

    What in the world could that be, you ask?

  • Clarence Miller achieved much in his life before passing away Wednesday night at the age of 98, but his true legacy might be his deep love for his community.

    That love is most evidenced by his generous donation of his 133-acre family farm to Shelby County, which is now known as Red Orchard Park. His nephew, Lowry Miller, said that gift was his uncle’s way of letting the entire community know how much he cared.