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Today's Features

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    As Kentucky starts to take shape as a part of Virginia, life on the frontier, including in what is today Shelby County, remained difficult and dangerous.

    I set out to write this series of columns as a chronology of early Kentucky history, basically a routine list of dates and events, milestones in time. I now realize that some events are of such significance, or unusual character, that they cry out for amplification. I have answered the cry!

     

    1780

  • 1775

    Daniel Boone and his trailblazers, including his younger brother Squire, had reached the future site of Boonesborough at the confluence of the Kentucky River and Otter Creek on April 1, 1775.  Judge Richard Henderson of the newly formed Transylvania Company, the leader of the expedition, having signed a treaty with the Cherokees, brought his main party to join Boone at the chosen site on April 20.

  • Though Saturday dawned cool and cloudy, the sound of children’s laughter at Red Orchard Park warmed the souls of those in attendance for Bunny Days.

    Shelby County Parks and Recreation Director Shawn Pickens glanced around at the 200 children and adults who bundled up against chilly morning temperatures to hunt eggs and find prizes.

    “We’re down a little from last year, because it’s so cool, but all in all, I think it’s going really well,” he said.

  • Though Saturday dawned cool and cloudy, the sound of children’s laughter at Red Orchard Park warmed the souls of those in attendance for Bunny Days.

    Shelby County Parks and Recreation Director Shawn Pickens glanced around at the 200 children and adults who bundled up against chilly morning temperatures to hunt eggs and find prizes.

    “We’re down a little from last year, because it’s so cool, but all in all, I think it’s going really well,” he said.

  • If the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach, then Cherry Settle must have a claim on her husband Tommy’s heart for the next millennium.

    The couple’s beautiful 144-year-old antebellum-style home on Shelbyville Road, where they have resided for the past four decades and raised their two children, Jennifer and Tommy Jr., was the former residence of Col. Harland Sanders and his wife, Claudia.

    And while changes occur over forty years, the Settles could never change one thing that helped launch an American icon.

  • If the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach, then Cherry Settle must have a claim on her husband Tommy’s heart for the next millennium.

    The couple’s beautiful 144-year-old antebellum-style home on Shelbyville Road, where they have resided for the past four decades and raised their two children, Jennifer and Tommy Jr., was the former residence of Col. Harland Sanders and his wife, Claudia.

    And while changes occur over forty years, the Settles could never change one thing that helped launch an American icon.

  • As a result of the defeat of the forces of Pope Pius IX in the battle of Castelfidardo on Sept. 18, 1860, and its aftermath, the Papal States were reduced significantly in size and in influence. Lost to the Piedmontese were Papal territories to the East of Rome, including the Adriatic seaport of Ancona. It was a bloody battle in which the Pope’s forces, totaling 9,000, faced 60,000 Piedmontese.

  • The wind in her hair, with sounds of the most dangerous animals on earth roaring in her ears on the plains of Africa, Marty Mason of Bagdad has proven time and again why she ranked among the top five in the international Extreme Huntress competition last year.

    Her home in Bagdad, where she lives with her husband, Bob, features a trophy room the couple built after they discovered the joys of big-game hunting in Africa in 2008, and the walls are adorned with dozens of trophies from zebra to hippo to antelope.

  • The wind in her hair, with sounds of the most dangerous animals on earth roaring in her ears on the plains of Africa, Marty Mason of Bagdad has proven time and again why she ranked among the top five in the international Extreme Huntress competition last year.

    Her home in Bagdad, where she lives with her husband, Bob, features a trophy room the couple built after they discovered the joys of big-game hunting in Africa in 2008, and the walls are adorned with dozens of trophies from zebra to hippo to antelope.