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Today's Features

  • On September 27, 1943, while still based on Guadalcanal, we were informed that the Third Marine Division would land in the vicinity of Cape Torokina, Empress Augusta Bay, Bougainville, and seize and defend a beachhead between the Torokina and Laruma rivers. This was a lightly defended area, on the eastern shore, far from the main Japanese forces.

  • You have probably seen some of Shelby’s 15 members of the Stubblefield Repeater Radio Club out in the community performing various communications services without ever realizing it.

    “Emergency management calls on us quite frequently to do events for back up communications in Shelby County,” said Marvin Bowman, president of the club. “You can use ham radio if the internet is not available or if it’s down. During severe weather, we have storm spotters out relaying information to the national weather service.”

  • Introduction to a new series

    I have just concluded a 31-part series of columns covering my initial five years of service as a commissioned officer in the regular U. S. Marine Corps. It was based upon my Marine Corps Journal, which I kept in long hand from 1937 until journals were prohibited for security reasons in 1942.

    This series had been well received by readers of diverse interests, including a preeminent frontier painter, a senior financial consultant, and a friend who has delivered my daily newspaper for years.

  • July 25, 1942

    M.B. New River, N.C. – I was detached from WASP on 25 June after my request to remain on board was disapproved by headquarters.

  • May 13, 1942

    Two days south of Scapa. This trip has been more gratifying than the last. Over the weekend the Spits we delivered to Malta shot down or destroyed 110 Axis planes [Generally in agreement with historical records of the Siege of Malta], losing only seven themselves.

  • Want to jazz up your workout or even begin a fun new one?

    You might want to pop in at Jazzercise on Main Street and join in the fun.

    Diane Young smiled as she began to warm up.

    “I really like it,” she said. “I had a total knee replacement September 13 and this has really helped me.”

    Nel Grin, instructor and owner of the facility, said that having fun is the key to a successful exercise routine in terms of longevity.

  • Note: I would like to express again my appreciation to Wendy Noble, younger sister of Spitfire pilots Jerry and Rod Smith, who has provided advice and copies of her trove of documents concerning her brothers’ lives. In doing so I would like to quote from The Spitfire Smiths by Rod Smith, with Christopher Shores. In his Introduction, Shores writes: “Throughout I have been greatly assisted by Wendy Noble without whose efforts I certainly could not have completed this account...”

  • “We are literally heartbroken,” said J.P. Seppenfield. “He was only seven years old, and he got lymphoma. The vet looked at us, and said, ‘If you were a billionaire, you couldn’t save him.’”

    Seppenfield, his wife Frieda, daughter Morgan and son Jonathan couldn’t save Woodford, their cherished Australian Shepherd, so they set out to make his last week of life as comfortable as they could. They wanted desperately to give him back just a small fraction of the joy he had brought into their lives.

  • Surrounded by tender, flaky fish frying to perfection, golden brown hush puppies piling up in baskets and a bevy of delectable desserts awaiting hordes of diners, Kent Herold scurried all around the Church of the Annunciation’s community center Friday, making sure everything was in order for the first fish fry of the Lenten season.

  • Author’s Note: This is my 200th column in a series “History Researched and Recalled,” published in The Sentinel-News since 2007.

    [I continue to depart from My Marine Corps Journal temporarily to describe the hazardous missions of a spitfire pilot.]

    Selected entries in Jerry Smith’s Diary: