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Today's Features

  • If the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach, then Cherry Settle must have a claim on her husband Tommy’s heart for the next millennium.

    The couple’s beautiful 144-year-old antebellum-style home on Shelbyville Road, where they have resided for the past four decades and raised their two children, Jennifer and Tommy Jr., was the former residence of Col. Harland Sanders and his wife, Claudia.

    And while changes occur over forty years, the Settles could never change one thing that helped launch an American icon.

  • If the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach, then Cherry Settle must have a claim on her husband Tommy’s heart for the next millennium.

    The couple’s beautiful 144-year-old antebellum-style home on Shelbyville Road, where they have resided for the past four decades and raised their two children, Jennifer and Tommy Jr., was the former residence of Col. Harland Sanders and his wife, Claudia.

    And while changes occur over forty years, the Settles could never change one thing that helped launch an American icon.

  • As a result of the defeat of the forces of Pope Pius IX in the battle of Castelfidardo on Sept. 18, 1860, and its aftermath, the Papal States were reduced significantly in size and in influence. Lost to the Piedmontese were Papal territories to the East of Rome, including the Adriatic seaport of Ancona. It was a bloody battle in which the Pope’s forces, totaling 9,000, faced 60,000 Piedmontese.

  • The wind in her hair, with sounds of the most dangerous animals on earth roaring in her ears on the plains of Africa, Marty Mason of Bagdad has proven time and again why she ranked among the top five in the international Extreme Huntress competition last year.

    Her home in Bagdad, where she lives with her husband, Bob, features a trophy room the couple built after they discovered the joys of big-game hunting in Africa in 2008, and the walls are adorned with dozens of trophies from zebra to hippo to antelope.

  • The wind in her hair, with sounds of the most dangerous animals on earth roaring in her ears on the plains of Africa, Marty Mason of Bagdad has proven time and again why she ranked among the top five in the international Extreme Huntress competition last year.

    Her home in Bagdad, where she lives with her husband, Bob, features a trophy room the couple built after they discovered the joys of big-game hunting in Africa in 2008, and the walls are adorned with dozens of trophies from zebra to hippo to antelope.

  • Included in the Daily New Era in Hopkinsville on March 7, 1908, was this headline:

    “LUCKY FRENCHMAN HAS WON THE LOVE OF GLADYS DEACON”

    “After the Affair of a Smitten Prince and a Duke ‘Turned Down,’ Comes the Triumph of Young Baron de Charette, and Another International Romance Is Launched”

  • For the fourth year in a row, animal lovers turned out in droves to pack Claudia Sanders Dinner House to raise money for animals.

    “Are we sold out – are you kidding?” said Kate Raisor, glancing around at the horde of 350-plus patrons, mostly decked out in various hues of red, pink and black, milling around the banquet room Friday night.

  • For the fourth year in a row, animal lovers turned out in droves to pack Claudia Sanders Dinner House to raise money for animals.

    “Are we sold out – are you kidding?” said Kate Raisor, glancing around at the horde of 350-plus patrons, mostly decked out in various hues of red, pink and black, milling around the banquet room Friday night.

  • Shelby County’s animal welfare workers and volunteers will be celebrating this evening at the Claudia Sanders Dinner House – but they also will be focusing on a big job ahead.

    The event is the fourth Monarchs, Mutts and Meows dinner dance fundraiser, with proceeds being shared by the five county organizations that work to rescue stray or deserted animals and find them new homes.

    The good news is that the event has been so well supported. Tickets have already sold out.

  • From the time she saw the house, Pat Hornback knew, she said, that it was something that would be perfect, but that took some convincing.

    “I wanted to run a bulldozer through it, but she didn’t,” said her husband, Paul Hornback. “Pat is very good at looking at something and being able to see what it will look like when it’s finished. I couldn’t see it, but she knew it was going to be something special.”