.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • The threads we have woven together in the 10 years since terrorists stole commercial airliners and flew them into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and, with help, a field in Pennsylvania form a yarn that stretches across generations.

    We look back, and those of us who saw what happened, saw those Twin Towers pierced by jets, saw them one by one crumble and fall as if they were a child’s toys and not man-made spires, feel that yarn wrap around us with a tension that won’t ever quite ease up, even after days, weeks and years and – now – a decade.

  • No one has ever forgotten the terrible loss of American life 10 years ago at the hands of terrorists.

    Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong called it one of the worst days in our nation’s history.

    Now, a decade after al-Qaida terrorists killed 3,000 people in four separate attacks in New York City, the Pentagon, and Pennsylvania, as the nation prepares to honor its dead on Sunday, many are reflecting upon the changes that terrible day has wrought on our society.

    In Shelby County, the answer is clear.

  • Roger and Aline Davis of Shelbyville were married Aug. 23, 1951, in New Albany, Ind.

    They have two sons, Robert, and his wife, Ellazane Davis, and Mike, and his wife, Kim, Davis; one grandson, Justin; step-grandson, Josh Cook and his wife, Amanda; and three step-great grandsons.

    They celebrated with a renewal ceremony in the presence of family and friends in the floral garden courtyard setting of Dawson Springs Health and Rehabilitation Center. Rev. Wes Curtis, employee of the center, officiated the ceremony.

  • Robin Frazier of Shelbyville and Gary and Sharon Roy of Russell Springs announce the engagement of their daughter, Hannah Lynn Roy of Shelbyville, to Shane Allen Booth of Shelbyville. He is the son of Lee Ann Rogers of Shelbyville and Jerry Booth of Waddy.

    Roy is a 2005 graduate of Shelby County High School and is a preschool teacher for Dorman Preschool Center.

    Booth is a 2005 graduate of Shelby County High School and is a computer technician for Shelby County Public Schools.

    The wedding will take place at 4 p.m. Saturday at Gallrein Farms.

  • About 85 pilots will fill up the airspace over Moody Pike this weekend with aeronautical feats as high as 200 feet in the air and plummeting toward the ground before pulling up just feet over the grass.

    Of course, these pilots will be grounded for the entire third annual The Bruce F3K competition of discus launch gliders.

    The competition is the largest in the world, and the brainchild of Bruce Davidson, who lives on Moody Pike at the site of the contest.

  • Monday dawned wet and stormy, but people in Waddy were determined not to let rain and chilly temperatures keep them from enjoying their Labor Day festivities.

    “Heck, we’ve been busy since seven o’clock this morning,” said Tracy Steinmiller, who along with Helen McKinney, watched as people waded through the wet grass to browse through a myriad of items for sell at a yard sale in the church yard at Waddy Baptist Church.

  • When faced with an unplanned pregnancy, hope is a welcome word.

    With the surprise that often accompanies this revelation, there can also be fear, sadness or delayed joy. Hope comes with an understanding of the choices a woman has to live with her discovery. Hope comes with an embrace, a place of welcome, and a caring person to walk with in dealing with the event of an unplanned pregnancy. 

  • Public meetings
    Simpsonville City Commission will have a specail public hearing on its ad valorem tax rate at 8:15 a.m. Thursday at the Simpsonville City Hall. A special called meeting will follow at 8:30.
    Shelbyville City Council meets at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at City Hall, 315 Washington St.
    Shelby County Fiscal Court meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Stratton Center, 215 Washington St. Tuesday.
    Simpsonville City Commission meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Simpsonville City Hall.

  • Although often overshadowed by his famous older brother Daniel, Squire Boone left a mark on Shelby County that will never be forgotten.

    After leaving the Falls of the Ohio settlement, which would eventually become Louisville, and establishing the Painted Stone settlement on Clear Creek in 1780, Boone and the 13 families he brought with him were the county's first permanent residents.

    And because of that, Joe Ruble believes Squire Boone should be better recognized here.