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Today's Features

  • Monday dawned wet and stormy, but people in Waddy were determined not to let rain and chilly temperatures keep them from enjoying their Labor Day festivities.

    “Heck, we’ve been busy since seven o’clock this morning,” said Tracy Steinmiller, who along with Helen McKinney, watched as people waded through the wet grass to browse through a myriad of items for sell at a yard sale in the church yard at Waddy Baptist Church.

  • When faced with an unplanned pregnancy, hope is a welcome word.

    With the surprise that often accompanies this revelation, there can also be fear, sadness or delayed joy. Hope comes with an understanding of the choices a woman has to live with her discovery. Hope comes with an embrace, a place of welcome, and a caring person to walk with in dealing with the event of an unplanned pregnancy. 

  • Public meetings
    Simpsonville City Commission will have a specail public hearing on its ad valorem tax rate at 8:15 a.m. Thursday at the Simpsonville City Hall. A special called meeting will follow at 8:30.
    Shelbyville City Council meets at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at City Hall, 315 Washington St.
    Shelby County Fiscal Court meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Stratton Center, 215 Washington St. Tuesday.
    Simpsonville City Commission meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Simpsonville City Hall.

  • Although often overshadowed by his famous older brother Daniel, Squire Boone left a mark on Shelby County that will never be forgotten.

    After leaving the Falls of the Ohio settlement, which would eventually become Louisville, and establishing the Painted Stone settlement on Clear Creek in 1780, Boone and the 13 families he brought with him were the county's first permanent residents.

    And because of that, Joe Ruble believes Squire Boone should be better recognized here.

  • The band Caribou of Louisville will be playing at a pool party Saturday night at the Shelbyville Country Club. Paul Woods, a native of Shelby County,is drummer and vocalist in the band. Woods, 53, was educated at Shelbyville and Shelby County high schools and attended the University of Louisville and Murray State. He took a few moments for questions from The Sentinel-News about his career, Caribou and the event.

     

    The Sentinel-News: How did you become a part of Caribou?

  • How could you improve upon a perfect summer evening, with great weather and a light supper of fruit and wine in Undulata Farm’s charming historic home?

    Just throw in about a hundred or so people, with former Gov. Martha Layne Collins and Bobby Hudson to inspire them, and you’ll have the 2011 Metro United Way campaign kickoff.

  • The band Caribou of Louisville will be playing at a pool party Saturday night at the Shelbyville Country Club. Paul Woods, a native of Shelby County,is drummer and vocalist in the band. Woods, 53, was educated at Shelbyville and Shelby County high schools and attended the University of Louisville and Murray State. He took a few moments for questions from The Sentinel-News about his career, Caribou and the event.

     

    The Sentinel-News: How did you become a part of Caribou?

  • Tickets on sale for
    ‘Mulan Jr.’ at SCCT
    Tickets go on sale today for Mulan Jr. at the Shelby County Community Theater.
    This Disney musical, directed by Cyndi Powell Skellie, features more than 50 actors between the ages of 7 and 14.
    Performances are Sept. 16, 17, 23, 24 at 7:30 p.m. and Sept. 18 and 25 at 2:30 p.m.
    For tickets or more information, you can contact SCCT at 633-0222.

  • Robert D. Kemper was considered a Shelby County hero long before he was killed in the line of duty in 1971, and 40 years later, efforts are being made to keep that memory alive forever.
    Work is under way to memorialize the U.S. Navy officer known as “Boo Boo,” who flew 256 combat missions as a fighter pilot during the Vietnam War and was killed while saving another aviator during a states-side training flight in 1971.

  • Robert D. Kemper was considered a Shelby County hero long before he was killed in the line of duty in 1971, and 40 years later, efforts are being made to keep that memory alive forever.
    Work is under way to memorialize the U.S. Navy officer known as “Boo Boo,” who flew 256 combat missions as a fighter pilot during the Vietnam War and was killed while saving another aviator during a states-side training flight in 1971.