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Today's Features

  • Sam and Joyce Medley may not be Mr. and Mrs. Claus, but they are the closest things to them this side of the North Pole.

    The Medleys, who live in Finchville, love Christmas so much that walking into their home around Christmastime is like walking into Santa’s toy shop or stepping into a magical land, where one first encounters a miniature village decked out for the holidays, with wreaths on every tiny door and candles glowing in its windows, nestled into a snow bank of fluffy white cotton.

  • Cold weather and a few inches of snow couldn't stop Santa and the Shelbyville Christmas parade Saturday.

    The parade went off with only a minor hitch despite flurries and icy conditions downtown.

    "That's the first time we've faced that kind of weather," Shelby County Fire Chief Bobby Cowherd said. "We were kind of running around all morning trying to figure out what we were going to do."

    Once they decided to move on with the parade, the crowd responded.

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    Have a hard-to-buy-for person on your Christmas list?

  • Shelbyville resident and author Byron Crawford says he considers himself a good listener.

    He says he learned the art of listening while at his mother’s knee, in the tobacco barns, at the feedlots and fishing ponds of Lincoln County. He says he loved to listen to his parents’ friends tell stories.

    “I had great upbringing, and storytelling was a part of it,” Crawford says. “Some of the best storytellers I have ever met were the men and women I grew up listening to.

  • Shelbyville resident and author Byron Crawford says he considers himself a good listener.

    He says he learned the art of listening while at his mother’s knee, in the tobacco barns, at the feedlots and fishing ponds of Lincoln County. He says he loved to listen to his parents’ friends tell stories.

    “I had great upbringing, and storytelling was a part of it,” Crawford says. “Some of the best storytellers I have ever met were the men and women I grew up listening to.

  • The Ruritan Club in Mount Eden boasted the sights and sounds of the season Friday night, with a good crowd, who enjoyed a chili support, homemade desserts and holiday music.

    Visitors who attended Christmas in Mount Eden had the opportunity to participate in a silent auction and a quilt raffle, as well as browse through a wide variety of homemade arts and crafts for sale.

  • Many of us will be heading over the river and through the woods to celebrate Thanksgiving with our families. After eating the last bite of sweet potato pie, the top button and belt are undone while we settle in to watch a football game or the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade. But many residents of Shelby County are not so fortunate.

    For those, turkey and dressing may not dot the table with cranberries and mashed potatoes.

    However, several groups throughout the county want to make sure everyone has a traditional big meal that ends with pumpkin pie.

  •  He’s back.

    After a 5-year absence, he looms larger than ever over the town of Mount Eden.

    He may not have an official name, but he stands tall nevertheless.

    Eighteen feet tall, to be exact.

  • John Kalmey has been farming all his life, and as it turns out, a life in agriculture runs in his family - well, for at least the past 360 years or so.

    Kalmeys have owned farms all over Jefferson and Shelby counties, including part of what is now Louisville International Airport. John Kalmey lives on a dairy farm on Zaring Mill Road, as he has for 61 years and where he raised his family.

    He's 86 now, and Kalmey's friends Clarence Miller and Brig. Gen. Ron Van Stockum had been telling him he needed to get moving if he wanted to see his family's heritage.