.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • You can tell it’s January by the throngs of people heading to the gym to work off the holiday pounds.

    The thing is, how long will it last?

    Jerimiah Heath, director at the Family Activity Center at Clear Creek Park, said in general, people start to lose their enthusiasm by the end of February.

  • In a small room in a familiar building on U.S. 60, a young black cat named Buster is not feeling well.
    He lies on an examining table at the Kresin Veterinary Clinic as the doctor takes his vitals, examines his eyes and consoles his concerned owner about the health of this recently adopted, 4-month-old feline.
    Only this wasn’t Dr. Jon Kresin doing the doctoring, as he had so many thousands of animals in that same room for the past half-century. This doctor is familiar, too.

  • 5-generations of the Sanford family gathered recently for a photograph. Pictured are (on floor) Noel Sanford and her daughter, Abagail Sanford; (second row) Ryan Sanford, holding his daughter, Mary, Lorene Mahoney, holding her great-great grandson Gabriel Jackson, grandfather Billy Sanford; and (back row) Amber Jackson and Joyce Sanford, great-grandmother.

  • Mandi and Vince McNeal were married on Oct. 17 in the garden of the Bodley Bullock House in Lexington.

    Mandi McNeal is the daughter of Dee Lisa Willard of Shelbyville and Willie Willard of Waddy.

    The groom is the son of Teresa Schmidt of Oldham County.

    Wedding music was provided by Forrest and Emily Coleman, who sang "The Love I Found in You" and "This Day." Sound was provided by Luke Wisely.

  • Public meetings

    Shelbyville-Shelby County Parks Board meeting is 7 p.m. Tuesday in the FAC Conference Room

    The Shelbyville Historic District Commission will meet 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at 627 Main Street, in the new Shelbyville Welcome/Heritage Center.

    Shelbyville City Council meets at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at City Hall, 315 Washington St.

  • He was only 2 years old, but Joe Sullivan said he could remember getting out of bed in the middle of the night to go to the window and watch a storm cross the plains around his home in Iowa.
    He wasn’t acting out of fear.
    “I was a weather junkie,” he said.
    “I used to chase storms on my bike when I was a kid, and when I got to be a teenager, I chased them on a Moped.
    “I was fearless. I would just drive right into storms.”

  • He was only 2 years old, but Joe Sullivan said he could remember getting out of bed in the middle of the night to go to the window and watch a storm cross the plains around his home in Iowa.
    He wasn’t acting out of fear.
    “I was a weather junkie,” he said.
    “I used to chase storms on my bike when I was a kid, and when I got to be a teenager, I chased them on a Moped.
    “I was fearless. I would just drive right into storms.”

  • When EMS pioneer Tommy Sampson passed away on Christmas Day, his death was just the latest in what has been a particularly harsh year for Shelby Countians.
    A former state leader and prominent lawyer, a beloved former basketball coach, a couple of Shelbyville’s longest serving business owners, an angel who helped women and children and a man who delivered the mail and kept the city’s history.
    These are just a few of the many prominent citizens who died in 2010.

  • Betty Curtsinger laughed as she recalled an incident in the mid-1990s that made her start thinking about running for magistrate.

    “I attended a meeting where they [magistrates] were talking about revising the county’s code of ethics, and I brought up the subject of nepotism,” she recalled. “I held my notes up in the air, and I said to Judge [Bobby] Stratton, ‘I want to know what your opinion is on giving jobs to family members.’”