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Today's Features

  • Shortly after arriving back at San Pedro in May, 1939, I was detached from the Tennessee and ordered to report to the Marine Corps Base in San Diego. There I joined Company D, the machine gun company of the 1st Battalion, 6th Marines.

    I have been chronicling the early years of a Marine Corps career that began with my commissioning as a second lieutenant in 1937, upon graduation from the University of Washington, including descriptions of the Panama Canal, Bermuda, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Boston and, at some length, New York.

  • My 2-part series has been expanded to four parts. In the first two parts of this narrative, I have described my wonder, as a young Marine second lieutenant, upon visiting the East Coast for the first time.

    Upon my completion of officer training and indoctrination at the Marine Basic School in the Philadelphia Navy Yard in May 1938, I traveled to my next duty station, the USS Tennessee, a battleship then anchored off its home port, San Pedro, Calif.

  • Combat is the primary challenge of a Marine, but there are many days when fighting is far from the primary agenda.

    In the first days of a 30-year career in the U.S. Marine Corps, I was dispatched to the Marine Officers Basic School at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, my first trip east from my home in Washington state.

    I got a chance to learn much, and for five years I recorded these memories in a journal that now is part of the Filson Historical Society.

  • Combat is the primary challenge of a Marine, in fact the raison d’etre of any fighting service, but there are long periods of conditioning and training between battles, providing opportunities for new experiences, many unique to those in the military.

    As an honor graduate of the University of Washington’s Army ROTC program, I was offered a commission as a second lieutenant in the regular U.S. Marine Corps, effective July 1, 1937, a week before my 21st birthday. However, approval of military commissions that year were delayed in the Senate.

  • Corpus Christi Classical Academy students performed Jack and the Beanstalk on April 17 in the Simpsonville Gymnasium.

  • The Cropper Ruritan Club presented the 2015 Citizenship and Patriotism Award at their awards dinner to Patsy Brown. Brown, who was called “a great asset to the community,” has fostered a love of her country and displayed her pride in being a citizen by promoting activities. Brown has been a member of the Cropper Ruritan club for 12 years. Pictured with Brown is Cropper Ruritan Club President, Bryan Franklin.

  • This week
    Young Frankenstein at CHS
    Collins High School will present Young Frankenstein at 7 p.m. Friday at the performing arts center. Tickets for these performances can be purchased at the door for $8 for adults and $3 for students and kids. Nearly 45 students have been working since December onstage and behind the scenes to make this the most unique and entertaining in the school’s history.
    Finchville Ruritan annual yard sale

  • John P. Gramig has enrolled in the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps program at Eastern Kentucky University. Upon graduation and completion of ROTC Military Science courses at the host university, the cadet receives a bachelor's degree and a commission of second lieutenant in the U.S. Army.

  • Logan A. Forresthas enrolled in the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps program at Eastern Kentucky University. Upon graduation and completion of ROTC Military Science courses at the host university, the cadet receives a bachelor's degree and a commission of second lieutenant in the U.S. Army.

  • This week
    Free tax prep services