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Today's Features

  • Shortly after arriving back at San Pedro in May, 1939, I was detached from the Tennessee and ordered to report to the Marine Corps Base in San Diego. There I joined Company D, the machine gun company of the 1st Battalion, 6th Marines.

    I have been chronicling the early years of a Marine Corps career that began with my commissioning as a second lieutenant in 1937, upon graduation from the University of Washington, including descriptions of the Panama Canal, Bermuda, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Boston and, at some length, New York.

  • My 2-part series has been expanded to four parts. In the first two parts of this narrative, I have described my wonder, as a young Marine second lieutenant, upon visiting the East Coast for the first time.

    Upon my completion of officer training and indoctrination at the Marine Basic School in the Philadelphia Navy Yard in May 1938, I traveled to my next duty station, the USS Tennessee, a battleship then anchored off its home port, San Pedro, Calif.

  • Combat is the primary challenge of a Marine, but there are many days when fighting is far from the primary agenda.

    In the first days of a 30-year career in the U.S. Marine Corps, I was dispatched to the Marine Officers Basic School at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, my first trip east from my home in Washington state.

    I got a chance to learn much, and for five years I recorded these memories in a journal that now is part of the Filson Historical Society.

  • Combat is the primary challenge of a Marine, in fact the raison d’etre of any fighting service, but there are long periods of conditioning and training between battles, providing opportunities for new experiences, many unique to those in the military.

    As an honor graduate of the University of Washington’s Army ROTC program, I was offered a commission as a second lieutenant in the regular U.S. Marine Corps, effective July 1, 1937, a week before my 21st birthday. However, approval of military commissions that year were delayed in the Senate.

  • Crescent Place Assisted Living hosted their annual Derby Tea Party. Clients and friends gathered to enjoy tea and desserts.

     

     

  • Dan and Myra Hardesty have been married for 50 years and will celebrate on Friday with a special family dinner.

    They have one daughter, Danielle Crowe and son-n-law Coy Crowe; and two grandsons, Shawn and Austin Crowe.

    We are so grateful for their love and their example over the years and look forward to many happy memories to come.

  • Specialist Kyle A. Gramigwill be promoted to the rank of sergeant on May 1 and awarded the Army Commendation Medal at 8-1 Cavalry, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, WA. He has also earned the expert infantry badge and an associate’s degree from Central Texas University. Sgt. Gramig will be reassigned June 1 to the 101st Airbone Division, 1-327 Infantry Regiment, Fort Campbell. He is a 2009 graduate of Fort Knox High School and is the son of Lt. Col. (R) Keith and MaryAnn Gramig.

  • Cadet John P. Gramig was recently awarded the John B. Hanlon Leadership Award and will graduate May 15 from the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps program at Eastern Kentucky University with a bachelor's degree in business and an active duty commission of Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. After completing Field Artillery specialty training at Fort Sill, OK, 2nd Lt. Gramig will be assigned to Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. He is a 2011 graduate of Collins High School and is the son of Lt. Col. (R) Keith and MaryAnn Gramig.

  • This week
    Moon gardening

  • Corpus Christi Classical Academy students performed Jack and the Beanstalk on April 17 in the Simpsonville Gymnasium.