Today's Features

  • In the summer of 1952, upon completion of my duty as Senior Marine Officer on the flagship of Rear Admiral Brittain, I had expectations of returning to infantry duty.

    However, fate intervened.

    The Commander of the Marine Barracks at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center in Illinois, about 40 miles north of Chicago, had been suddenly relieved of his command.

    Nearing the end of my sea duty and considered a suitable replacement available immediately, I was ordered to replace him

  • End of Bachelorhood

    On Flag Day, June 14, 1949, lovely Susanne de Charette and I were married. I adopted her little daughter, Michele Solange Marshall, not yet three. Susanne’s first husband, Charles (Chunky) Marshall, was the son of Judge C. C. Marshall, the longest serving of all Shelby County, Kentucky Circuit Court Judges (1907-1943), a total of 36 years.

  • On April 1, 1945, while flying home, having competed a combat tour in the Pacific of nearly 26 months, I heard on the plane’s radio news of the assault on Okinawa that day.

    This was the beginning of another struggle with a skilled and determined enemy, who augmented his defenses this time with kamikaze pilots who deliberately crashed their bomb-laden planes on naval ships.

    On land and sea a terrible toll was exacted, foretelling a bloody struggle for the home islands of Japan, planned for later that year.

    With my parents

  • At this point in my current series, having completed writing about combat experiences during WW II, it seems timely to write about “Heroes and Heroism.”

    I have thought a great deal about real heroes and their acts of heroism. Certainly my front-line machine gunners on Guam who held their ground and died, while others fell back and survived, were heroes, unrecognized and unsung

  • The aura that surrounded a huge crowd smiling and laughing while busily loading items into boxes Saturday seemed more like a party than a charitable event.

    That’s because the more than two hundred volunteers who came together to pack enough food to feed 53,000 people for a week really enjoyed helping the less fortunate, said Jason Haggard, outreach and missions pastor at Shelby Christian.

    “They are all very dedicated,” he said, watching them scurrying around the huge gym at Shelby Christian Church on Franklin Road.

  • With winter winds still nipping at the backs of Shelby’s homeless; the gift of a warm blanket could mean the difference between life and death when you’re sleeping under a bridge or in a vacant house.

    When 20 students from Corpus Christi Classical Academy made the rounds of three different charitable organizations with hundreds of blankets to donate for the use of those in the county’s shelters, their generosity warmed the hearts of those who help to clothe and house the homeless.

  • Doug and Ruth Welch love eating maple syrup – they eat it on, well, just about anything.

    "I don't eat it as much as I'd like to, but I put it on just about everything," Doug Welch said with a sheepish grin as he checked the thermostat on part of his maple syrup collection system on his farm in eastern Shelby County.

    The evaporator, complete with a cast iron door that he opens to throw in a couple more logs, sits next to a huge pile of neatly stacked firewood that lines one entire wall of what he affectionately calls his sugar shack.

  • All Saints Catholic

    Mass is at 8 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. on Sunday. All are welcome to attend. Located at 410 Main St., Taylorsville.


    Allen Chapel United Methodist

    Services are at 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Located on KY 55 in Finchville. The Rev. Robert Raglin is the pastor.


    Bagdad Baptist


    SCCT presents A Christmas Carol Musical: Ebenezer