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Today's Features

  • “We were going to the prom, and she had on this pretty dress, and that was the night I knew she was the one,” said Paul Morris, the memory of that moment still alive in his eyes as he smiled at his wife, Ethel. 

    Paul Morris celebrated his 80th birthday last week; his wife is 76. Outwardly, they look very different from a photo taken 60 years ago that graces their room at Amber Oaks Assisted Living Community.

    But their love is still as strong as ever.

  • In September 1995 my son Reggie took his mother Susanne, then 80, on a trip to France, including a visit to the Grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes, near the border between France and Spain.

    She had first visited the shrine with her father in 1926 when she was eleven. Susanne described her impressions:

    I touched Reggie’s cheek and he touched my cheek. And there was an atmosphere of prayer, no giggling, no laughing or anything. Just a very comfortable place to be because everybody else was doing the same thing. And it was very emotional.

  • During our several trips to France, while we always visited our good friends Jean-Michel and Guillemette Dunoyer de Segonzac in Brittany, we did not neglect beautiful Paris.

    We stayed at small reasonably priced hotels, and dined at inexpensive restaurants frequented by Parisians.

    Such informal trips would have been impossible without the entrée provided by Susanne’s family background, warm personality and capability to shift in mid-sentence between French and English, in easy conversations with patricians and functionaries alike.

  •  

    The Sentinel-News, since 2008, has honored at year’s end five Shelby Countians we think have had a significant impact on our community during the year. We sought your nominations on our Facebook page, and we believe each person – or team – selected for what we call Shelby County’s Fabulous 5, has in his or her own way left an imprint that merits our honoring and emulating, represents a broad spectrum of a diverse society and truly is one of the best of our best.

     

     

    Sam Eyle

  •  

    The Sentinel-News, since 2008, has honored at year’s end five Shelby Countians we think have had a significant impact on our community during the year. We sought your nominations on our Facebook page, and we believe each person – or team – selected for what we call Shelby County’s Fabulous 5, has in his or her own way left an imprint that merits our honoring and emulating, represents a broad spectrum of a diverse society and truly is one of the best of our best.

     

     

    Sam Eyle

  • General Baron Athanase Charles-Marin de Charette (1796-1848)

    At the royal court, Louise, Comtesse de Vierzon, granddaughter of Charles X of France, met a gallant cavalier, Athanase-Charles-Marin de Charette, (1796-1848), Chef d’escadron aux Chasseurs de la Garde Royal (Commander of the light cavalry squadron of the Royal Guard).

  • Valentine’s Day is Sunday, and lovers all over the globe are gearing up in many different ways – some traditional, and some not so much.

    Preparing for a perfect Valentine’s Day means something different to everyone, but a common theme in Shelbyville seems to be anything to do with food.

    “I’m hoping we can go to the Bell House for dinner,” said Mary Jo Netherton. “I will plant that suggestion in my husband’s head.”

  • Our good friends in France, Jean-Michel and Guillemette Dunoyer de Segonzac, drove us to General de Charette’s Chateau de la Basse Motte in Chateuneuf, six miles west of St Malo, which Susanne had inherited from her mother, the Marquise de Charette, in 1964.

  • In early February 1966, Gen. Lewis B. Hershey, Director of Selective Service (Draft), and his wife were our dinner guests at our quarters at the San Diego Marine Base. Appointed as head of the Selective Service System by President Roosevelt in 1940, Hershey had become the longest-serving director in the history of the Selective Service System, spanning World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.

    Working for the “Brute”

  • One day in February 1961, while serving on the staff of the 2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, I received an urgent summons from Maj. Gen. Phil Berkeley, the Division Commander. I wondered what I had done wrong this time!

    It turned out that the general’s growing dissatisfaction with his chief of staff’s performance had dramatically overcome his tolerance. He had abruptly ordered him to clear out his desk and get out.

    Suddenly the Chief of Staff