.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • 1792

    December 1:  A letter to Editor John Bradford, signed by Nicholas Meriwether, occupied three of the four front-page columns of the Kentucky Gazette. Extracts from Meriwether’s letter: 

     

  • Graduation Day 2014 was Saturday and Shelby's seniors celebrated with joys and tears.

  • Graduation Day 2014 was Saturday and Shelby's seniors celebrated with joys and tears.

  • 1788

    March 31, Tick Creek Massacre:  A band of Delawares attacked Bland Ballard’s log cabin located a few yards from the fort at Tyler’s Station on Tick Creek about six miles east of Shelbyville.

    Historian Vince Akers, an authority on the American Revolution in Kentucky, in a lecture at a meeting of the Painted Stone Settlers, spoke about Bland W. Ballard, who had been a member of the escorting militia during the Long Run Massacre:

  • Headline

     

     

    By Lisa King

    Traveling north on Todds Point Road, just before you get deep into the country, there is a large woodpile on the east side of the road. Roughly the size of the modest house and three greenhouses it surrounds, the woodpile seems to be way too much to heat a home, especially as we turn the corner into spring and summer.

    So what’s the purpose of such a massive amount of wood? Well, Kenneth Terrell will tell you, if you have a few minutes to listen to his tale.

  • Headline

     

     

    By Lisa King

    Traveling north on Todds Point Road, just before you get deep into the country, there is a large woodpile on the east side of the road. Roughly the size of the modest house and three greenhouses it surrounds, the woodpile seems to be way too much to heat a home, especially as we turn the corner into spring and summer.

    So what’s the purpose of such a massive amount of wood? Well, Kenneth Terrell will tell you, if you have a few minutes to listen to his tale.

  • 1782 – “The Year of Blood”
    Marked for death, with faces painted black, Dr. John Knight and his commanding officer, Col. William Crawford, awaited their fate. As described in my previous column, Crawford was burned at the stake with Knight being forced to watch the ordeal.
    Dr. Knight managed to survive by escaping from his captors, making his way back to Fort Pitt “in the Most Deplorable Condition Man could be in and be alive.”

  •  

    As Kentucky starts to take shape as a part of Virginia, life on the frontier, including in what is today Shelby County, remained difficult and dangerous.

    I set out to write this series of columns as a chronology of early Kentucky history, basically a routine list of dates and events, milestones in time. I now realize that some events are of such significance, or unusual character, that they cry out for amplification. I have answered the cry!

     

    1780

  • 1775

    Daniel Boone and his trailblazers, including his younger brother Squire, had reached the future site of Boonesborough at the confluence of the Kentucky River and Otter Creek on April 1, 1775.  Judge Richard Henderson of the newly formed Transylvania Company, the leader of the expedition, having signed a treaty with the Cherokees, brought his main party to join Boone at the chosen site on April 20.

  • Though Saturday dawned cool and cloudy, the sound of children’s laughter at Red Orchard Park warmed the souls of those in attendance for Bunny Days.

    Shelby County Parks and Recreation Director Shawn Pickens glanced around at the 200 children and adults who bundled up against chilly morning temperatures to hunt eggs and find prizes.

    “We’re down a little from last year, because it’s so cool, but all in all, I think it’s going really well,” he said.