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Today's Features

  • Shelby County had been created out of Jefferson County, Kentucky in 1792, with Shelbyville established as its county seat.  Settlers, nevertheless, had to be wary of Native American attacks although they were diminished in strength and in frequency.

    Vince Akers, an authority on early Shelby County history, in a paper prepared in 1979, described what he believed to be the final attack in Shelby County

    Smock Family Tragedy

  • Meat is probably the least transparent business on earth. 

    Our desire for cheap meat has created an industrial system that sates the American appetite of an estimated 200 pounds of meat per person each year.  That’s about twice the global average.  Plus, we seem to know very little about something we eat an awful lot. 

    The industrial meat business is predominately a closed system that takes place behind gated complexes, far from the potential consumer. 

  • Meat is probably the least transparent business on earth. 

    Our desire for cheap meat has created an industrial system that sates the American appetite of an estimated 200 pounds of meat per person each year.  That’s about twice the global average.  Plus, we seem to know very little about something we eat an awful lot. 

    The industrial meat business is predominately a closed system that takes place behind gated complexes, far from the potential consumer. 

  • 1792

    December 1:  A letter to Editor John Bradford, signed by Nicholas Meriwether, occupied three of the four front-page columns of the Kentucky Gazette. Extracts from Meriwether’s letter: 

     

  • Graduation Day 2014 was Saturday and Shelby's seniors celebrated with joys and tears.

  • Graduation Day 2014 was Saturday and Shelby's seniors celebrated with joys and tears.

  • 1788

    March 31, Tick Creek Massacre:  A band of Delawares attacked Bland Ballard’s log cabin located a few yards from the fort at Tyler’s Station on Tick Creek about six miles east of Shelbyville.

    Historian Vince Akers, an authority on the American Revolution in Kentucky, in a lecture at a meeting of the Painted Stone Settlers, spoke about Bland W. Ballard, who had been a member of the escorting militia during the Long Run Massacre:

  • Headline

     

     

    By Lisa King

    Traveling north on Todds Point Road, just before you get deep into the country, there is a large woodpile on the east side of the road. Roughly the size of the modest house and three greenhouses it surrounds, the woodpile seems to be way too much to heat a home, especially as we turn the corner into spring and summer.

    So what’s the purpose of such a massive amount of wood? Well, Kenneth Terrell will tell you, if you have a few minutes to listen to his tale.

  • Headline

     

     

    By Lisa King

    Traveling north on Todds Point Road, just before you get deep into the country, there is a large woodpile on the east side of the road. Roughly the size of the modest house and three greenhouses it surrounds, the woodpile seems to be way too much to heat a home, especially as we turn the corner into spring and summer.

    So what’s the purpose of such a massive amount of wood? Well, Kenneth Terrell will tell you, if you have a few minutes to listen to his tale.

  • 1782 – “The Year of Blood”
    Marked for death, with faces painted black, Dr. John Knight and his commanding officer, Col. William Crawford, awaited their fate. As described in my previous column, Crawford was burned at the stake with Knight being forced to watch the ordeal.
    Dr. Knight managed to survive by escaping from his captors, making his way back to Fort Pitt “in the Most Deplorable Condition Man could be in and be alive.”