.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • This week

    Capital City Crush

    travel softball tryouts

    Capital City Crush Travel Softball Team is moving to 12U. The Crush is mainly an ‘06 Team looking to add more ‘06 and ‘05 players. Tryouts are 6-8 p.m. Wednesday and 10 a.m. until noon Saturday at Sally Gaines Field in Frankfort. If unable to make one of the tryouts, call Tommy Fell at 502-316-0148 to arrange an alternate appointment time.

    Music on the Lawn

  • Fonte Ridge

    On July 22, the day following our landing, the 1st Battalion, of which I was Executive Officer (second-in command), was taken out of reserve and placed on the front line on Fonte Ridge, between the other two battalions of the 21st Marines.

  • Lucas, 9, Ruby Ann, 2, Mac, 5 and Elly, 7, Courtney, the children of Mary and Shane Courtney, raced around a vegetable stand on Vigo Road in Bagdad Monday like a group of rodeo clowns wrangling a bull back into its pen.

    The kids were serving customers at their produce stand put together to support two of their friends diagnosed with juvenile diabetes.

    "We've actually done better than I thought we would," said Lucas, as he bagged some vegetables for a customer, adding that they have raised $1,000 so far.

  • Lucas, 9, Ruby Ann, 2, Mac, 5 and Elly, 7, Courtney, the children of Mary and Shane Courtney, raced around a vegetable stand on Vigo Road in Bagdad Monday like a group of rodeo clowns wrangling a bull back into its pen.

    The kids were serving customers at their produce stand put together to support two of their friends diagnosed with juvenile diabetes.

    "We've actually done better than I thought we would," said Lucas, as he bagged some vegetables for a customer, adding that they have raised $1,000 so far.

  •  

    Author’s Note: In 2007, when I wrote my first column for The Shelbyville, Kentucky Sentinel-News, I thought I would run out of years before I ran out of columns. However, after passing Milestone 101 last week, I don’t seem to be running out of either, for this is my 209th column.

    Combat loaded aboard a Naval transport

  •  

    Planning and Training on Guadalcanal

    In January 1944, having returned from a successful Bougainville campaign, we began intense training for our next campaign, planned initially as an invasion of Kavieng, New Ireland, in Papua, New Guinea, 300 miles north of Bougainville.

    However, in February, the outer screen of Japanese island defenses had been penetrated by the seizure of bases in the Marshall Islands, including Kwajalein and Eniwetok. In March and April, landings in the Admiralty Islands and Hollandia established additional shore bases.

  • The First Battalion continued its westward advance beyond the front lines to reach its objective where a stream was in front and the sea on the left flank. It then placed into effect it’s long-practiced SOP (Standing Operating Procedure) for jungle perimeter defense. Each of the three rifle companies, supported by one of my machine gun platoons to form the framework of the defense, occupied a third of the circle. I toured the front lines, tying in the fire plans of all automatic weapons so that continuous bands of grazing fire could be interlocked about the perimeter.

  • Later on Bougainville, while the Executive Officer (second-in-command) of the 1st Battalion, Major Eugene Strayhorn, a former Vanderbilt football star, and I were occupying our rudimentary advanced command post, a small mortar shell, the size of a hand grenade dropped into our hole.

    Fortunately after striking my carbine, and breaking its stock, it did not explode, so my Marine Corps career was not terminated. Strayhorn’s immediate reaction was “Van, they’ve got the range. Let’s get the hell out of here.”

  • Shelby County and Collins High Schools both held commencement exercises on Saturday.

  • The First Battalion continued its westward advance beyond the front lines to reach its objective where a stream was in front and the sea on the left flank. It then placed into effect it’s long-practiced SOP (Standing Operating Procedure) for jungle perimeter defense. Each of the three rifle companies, supported by one of my machine gun platoons to form the framework of the defense, occupied a third of the circle. I toured the front lines, tying in the fire plans of all automatic weapons so that continuous bands of grazing fire could be interlocked about the perimeter.