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Neighbors

  • Former Shelby coach, players carry on special relationship

    Every year for the past 16 years, a small but select group of men, most of them from Shelby County, has gathered on Lake Barkley for a not-so-unusual practice: fishing for a few days and sharing stories about life and sports.

    That these men first met more than 40 years ago may not be odd, either. That they were together but for a scant few of those years, when most of them were boys, is the twist.

  • Paying it forward

    When Andrea and George Cottrell received a van from Shelby County Community Charities last year, they knew they wouldn’t have it forever.

    And when Andrea Cottrell met Ava King, a 7-year-old at Clear Creek Elementary School who suffers from Cerebral Palsy, heart conditions and epilepsy, she said she knew where the van eventually would go.

  • The porch is a wonderful part of this historic home – but it’s not everything.

    With a little bit of “Queen Anne” and a dash of “Colonial Revival,” Kerry and Debbie Magan’s 110-year-old home on Main Street in Shelbyville has almost as much personality as its owners.

    Located at 1174 Main St., the was built by Jno A. Middleton for his son, James Fulton Middleton, after purchasing the property in 1901 from J.T. and Mary E. Logan. After building the home, Middleton then constructed the house next door to it, currently owned by Phil and Chris Hayes, for his daughter.

  • Paul Schmidt's lessons from a war against cancer

    Paul Schmidt has experienced the fear, the uncertainty, that dark realm that cancer brings firsthand.

    And he has triumphed.

    Cancer free for eight years now, Schmidt, a Shelbyville psychologist, will be one of hundreds of men expected to take advantage of the 12th annual Men’s Health Fair on Saturday morning at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, to get a full checkup on overall good health and – perhaps more emphatically – keep cancer at bay.

  • George Cottrell: 1966-2012

    George Cottrell, 46, a longtime figure in the community and at Shelby County High School, died Tuesday afternoon at his home in Shelbyville.

    Diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) – commonly called Lou Gehrig’s Disease – in February of 2011, Cottrell never let the disease slow him down.

    “His spirit was just tremendous,” said Todd Shipley, who worked with Cottrell at Shelby County High School and on the staff for the football team for whom Cottrell was the defensive coordinator up until the 2011 season.

  • George N. Busey: 1923-2012

    If you knew George N. Busey, maybe lived near him in Bagdad or interacted with him in the myriad ways he affected Shelby County, then you almost assuredly share today in the sense of loss felt by so many.

    Busey, a longtime farmer known far and wide for his civic mindedness, his love of his community and his character, died Sunday. He was 88.

  • Memorial Day service at Grove Hill draws large crowd

    More than 200 people braved the 90-degrees-plus temperatures Monday to attend the Memorial Day service at Grove Hill Cemetery.

    The crowd proved the spirit of patriotism is still alive and well as they gathered under tents, trees and even stood in the boiling sun to hear speakers, sing stirring songs and listen to the melancholy dirge of bagpipes and the solemn notes of “Taps.”

    After a walking tour of the cemetery hosted by Friends of Grove Hill, led by historian Mike Harrod, the crowd gathered outside the chapel for the service.

  • Wayne Ward: 1921-2012

    Wayne Ward had acquired quite a long list of distinguished accomplishments when he passed away Wednesday at the age of 90 – minister to a president, confidant of the famous – but his most precious legacy is that of encouragement, his friends say.

    “What people will remember him best for hands down will be as an encourager,” said Jay Tigner, pastor of Finchville Baptist Church.

    Tigner, who calls Ward his greatest mentor, said he always made people feel like what gift they could bring to others really matter, and that meant a lot to people.

  • VAN STOCKUM: Joseph Hornsby -- An early Shelby Countian Part 3: A chronicle of the early days of Shelby County

    Joseph Hornsby started keeping a chronicle of events in Shelby County in 1798, shortly after his arrival here.

    Chris McManus of Washington, D. C., a direct descendant of Hornsby, arranged a number of years ago for his family to donate this significant chronicle of early Shelby County history to the Filson Historical Society of Louisville.

  • Bagdad Day holds 20th birthday party to much community enthusiasm

    The sun may have been fickle in Bagdad on Saturday, but the smiles on the faces of those who attended the town's 20th anniversary festival lit up the day all over the small community.