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Neighbors

  • A style of its own

    The Biagi home on Brown Avenue in Shelbyville is somewhat like the family who lives there: contemporary, yet traditional, with several features that give it a unique personality all its own.

    The first thing that strikes the passerby is that there are plenty of windows and an attractive blend of limestone and natural wood tones.

    The wide front porch fits right in with the other houses in the neighborhood, but on closer inspection, an attractive limestone column in its center turns out to be the living room fireplace.

  • Mason retires after 13 years as head of Shelbyville Housing Authority

    If home is where the heart is, then Bill Mason will be leaving a big chunk of his behind following his retirement Tuesday after more than a decade of heading up the Shelbyville Housing Authority.

    To Mason, who has been its executive director of that agency for the past 13 years, the position has not been so much a job as a mission.

  • Losing a piece of history

    Shelbyville Historic District Coordinator Gail Reed will step away from her post at the end of the month. Since taking over in Shelbyville in April of 2000, Reed has watched several historic buildings be remade and brought back from near devastation and others torn down.

  • Shaping up Shelby: An exercise group on a roll

    There are millions of ways to stay fit, trim and healthy and all include watching your diet and maintaining proper nutrition. However, there are very few exercises that are as accessible and easy on the body as bicycling.

  • Don Cubert: 1929-2012

    Shelby County said farewell Tuesday to a beloved son, when Don Cubert Sr. was laid to rest, a man who was known all across the county for his devotion and love for his community and its people.

    A longtime businessman, as well as former city councilman and mayor, Cubert died Saturday at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville after a brief illness. He was 83.

    Cubert’s devotion to his community has endeared him to many, including Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger, who said he and his “Uncle Don” had a friendship that spanned decades.

  • Former Shelby coach, players carry on special relationship

    Every year for the past 16 years, a small but select group of men, most of them from Shelby County, has gathered on Lake Barkley for a not-so-unusual practice: fishing for a few days and sharing stories about life and sports.

    That these men first met more than 40 years ago may not be odd, either. That they were together but for a scant few of those years, when most of them were boys, is the twist.

  • Paying it forward

    When Andrea and George Cottrell received a van from Shelby County Community Charities last year, they knew they wouldn’t have it forever.

    And when Andrea Cottrell met Ava King, a 7-year-old at Clear Creek Elementary School who suffers from Cerebral Palsy, heart conditions and epilepsy, she said she knew where the van eventually would go.

  • The porch is a wonderful part of this historic home – but it’s not everything.

    With a little bit of “Queen Anne” and a dash of “Colonial Revival,” Kerry and Debbie Magan’s 110-year-old home on Main Street in Shelbyville has almost as much personality as its owners.

    Located at 1174 Main St., the was built by Jno A. Middleton for his son, James Fulton Middleton, after purchasing the property in 1901 from J.T. and Mary E. Logan. After building the home, Middleton then constructed the house next door to it, currently owned by Phil and Chris Hayes, for his daughter.

  • Paul Schmidt's lessons from a war against cancer

    Paul Schmidt has experienced the fear, the uncertainty, that dark realm that cancer brings firsthand.

    And he has triumphed.

    Cancer free for eight years now, Schmidt, a Shelbyville psychologist, will be one of hundreds of men expected to take advantage of the 12th annual Men’s Health Fair on Saturday morning at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, to get a full checkup on overall good health and – perhaps more emphatically – keep cancer at bay.

  • George Cottrell: 1966-2012

    George Cottrell, 46, a longtime figure in the community and at Shelby County High School, died Tuesday afternoon at his home in Shelbyville.

    Diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) – commonly called Lou Gehrig’s Disease – in February of 2011, Cottrell never let the disease slow him down.

    “His spirit was just tremendous,” said Todd Shipley, who worked with Cottrell at Shelby County High School and on the staff for the football team for whom Cottrell was the defensive coordinator up until the 2011 season.