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Neighbors

  • Shelby family grows by 2 adoptees from Ukraine

    Each day – every day for nearly 16 years – Tania Williams awoke in the orphanage in Ukraine.  Sixteen – the dreaded age that orphans in this Eastern European country “age out” to the streets, often thrown into a life of prostitution, drugs and crime. For Tania, it was a time of fear and anxiety, faced with no family and no physical or emotional support.

  • Love brings new life to old house

    John David and Mary Helen Myles have a 174-year-old baby.

    They have restored their 2-story brick Federal-style home they bought in 2002 with such loving care that the structure, known as the Dale Place, received the Ida Lee Willis Memorial Foundation Preservation Project Award in 2006.

    Myles, a Shelby County Family Court judge, is widely known throughout Shelby County for his love of history, and he went to great lengths to ensure that the house, when restored, should be as much as like the original as possible.

  • Library audience likes the taste of ‘Cornbread’

    If you’d like to settle down with a good book, chock full of colorful characters, such as  moonshiners, long-haired, pot-growing Vietnam veterans, and even a man so scary everybody started locking their doors at night after he moved to town, you might want to check out The Cornbread Mafia, which was published last year.

  • Alex Chambers Jr.: 1940-2013

    Alex Chambers Jr., a longtime newspaper delivery man, who had worked for The Sentinel-News for 40 years, died suddenly Wednesday at Jewish Hospital in Louisville.

    Chambers, 74, a Shelbyville resident, also had worked in maintenance at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville for 50 years.

    Chambers worked in the very early morning hours, collecting newspapers after they had been assembled for circulation and delivering them to post offices and retail outlets around the county.

  • Fred D. Trammell: 1914-2013

    Although he was a native of McCreary County, Fred Trammell left an indelible mark on Shelby County.

    He became the superintendent of Shelby County Public Schools in 1961 and guided the school board and administration through the consolidation process that led to the merger in 1975 of the Shelby County and Shelbyville school districts, the year after he retired from the position.

    Trammell, who also owned a beef cattle farm in Bagdad, died Saturday at Baptist Hospital East in Louisville. He was 98.

  • Joan Goodwin: 1932-2013 dies at age 80

    Joan Goodwin, who made significant contributions to removing drugs and alcohol issues from Shelby County, died Friday at Masonic Home Shelbyville. She was 80.

    Goodwin was a founder and former director, from 2001 to 2008, of the Shelby County Drug/Alcohol Advisory Council, now Shelby Prevention and also had worked with the Shelbyville Police Department’s Advisory Council.

  • Allen Purnell: He's the ‘goo-od’ guy!

    Clustered around Allen Purnell, a group of employees all answered at once when asked what they thought of their boss.

    "He's gooo-od!" they chorused in unison as Purnell grinned the same easy-going grin he has made famous in his popular television commercials.

    The group gaffawed when asked if they liked sausage.

    "Sure do," said Robert Purnell, the youngest of the Purnell men who work at F.B. Purnell Sausage in Simpsonville.

    "Well, he better," someone else said, amid more laughter.

  • How Shelbyville emerged from the era of racism

    Sitting at ease in his Shelbyville home, retired Shelby County High School teacher and coach Roland Dale, or "Coach Dale" as he's known to former students and athletes, shares his own history and some thoughts on the history of the county's black community; how it was, how it is now, how it ought to be, and his family's part in it all....

  • The legacy of Lincoln Institute

    Writers hate it when they miss an opportunity to write a timely story, and that is what happened to me last fall. I had done some research on the 100th anniversary of the opening of Lincoln Institute in October 1912, and planned to write a story about it. However, in the midst of selling one book, nudging a literary agent along on a second and writing a third, I dropped the ball.

  • A man of many faces

    “If you’re good, you’ll come off the stage sweating!”

    That’s how Cook Farmer, a Shelbyville resident of 8 years, views his avocation of acting in community theater, a “hobby” he said he has pursued since he was a lad of 12 years old.

    Now, 48 years later, having performed in “so many plays I can’t remember them all,” he is preparing for his latest role in Harvey at the Shelby County Community Theatre.