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Neighbors

  • Her final chapter is written

    When she first was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2005, Toni Ethington Roberts said she did what many of us would do: She went to the bookstores for help.

    She read and read, but none of the most popular self-help books seemed to shed light on the long, dark tunnel into which she was staring, so she said she decided to do something most people can’t do: She wrote her own story.

  • Looking Back: March 6, 2009

    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

     

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

  • They had a dream

    February is noted for the observance of history, most notably pertaining to American presidents and African-American history.

    Of course, Valentine's Day falls smack in the middle of the month, but that is very appropriate. Because that is a holiday reserved for love, and most historians are in love with the past.

    Or, more appropriately, they are in love with how the past has shaped our future.

    And some of those in love with history have publicly displayed their affection.

  • Qualifying taxpayers can get free preparation help

    Local residents with an annual income of less than $40,000 can get free tax preparation – if their returns aren’t too complicated.

    The program, which is being sponsored by Metro United Way, offers residents of Shelby and Oldham County free tax preparation by IRS-certified volunteers. It is available to any family with a household income less than $40,000 or any individual who makes less than $15,000.

  • Looking Back: Feb. 27, 2009

    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.  

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

  • A tribune to Robert A. Fay: Part II

    Another championed cause that took years to gain the attention it needed began with Bob Fay sending me down an alley in Shelbyville that he said deserved a photo page. What I saw in the short drive down the alley, unknown to most residents along Main Street, brought me to tears.

    Houses  with front doors resting on rusted hinges and leaving a gap at the top and bottom were crumbling to the ground. Old men sitting on porches that had holes in the floor with weeds growing through them waved shyly as I passed.

  • Seasoned with love

    Rob Rothenburger was adamant, clacking his spaghetti tongs together as he spoke.

    “No, no, I can't give up Mama Rothenburger's secret family chili recipe. But I will tell you this,” he said, leaning forward and glancing at the other contestant at the chili cook-off with a mischievous gleam in his eye, “this guy's secret ingredient is road kill!”

    After a chuckle as hearty as his chili, Shelby County’s Judge Executive excused himself to turn his attention to a question posed by a diner.

  • A tribute to Robert A. Fay Part 1

    We often speak of unsung heroes whose acts of kindness or courage, strokes of genius or divine luck, words of inspiration or encouragement; leave their mark on an individual or even a community. In an era when respect for people of the media is at an unprecedented and unfortunate low, there is one former publisher/editor whose good works even now, over 35 years after his retirement from journalism and departure from Shelby County, benefit our community.

    I recently learned that Robert A.

  • Looking Back: Feb. 20, 2009

    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.  

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

  • The model city: Edistyminen

    Hidden deep in the Andes Mountains, situated in a crater beneath man-made Lake Ingenuity, and alive inside the minds of three East Middle School students, lies a futuristic oasis.

    The imagined city of Edistyminen was designed for the early 2100s to shelter people from the ravages of a 22nd-century war that was set in motion by a cessation in oil production.

    Some of the world's brightest minds created a city that could stay hidden from the violence around it while sustaining itself with clean water, wind and waste energy.