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Neighbors

  • Vets rewarded for their sacrifice

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  • Shelby's last picture show

     You may have known it as a men’s clothing store or an antique store, a nicknack shop or the emporium of sweetness it is today.

    You may have wondered why its awning sticks out just a little farther than its neighbors, and if you’ve been inside, you might have considered that the floor space seemed to be unusual compared to others in Shelbyville.

    But what you may not know is that the building at 610 Main Street was for decades the center of entertainment in Shelby County: The Shelby Theater.

  • The show has a high and dry finish

     There was no rain and very little mud on Friday and Saturday nights when the 20th annual Shelbyville Horse Show had its final events. Organizers reveled in the throngs who crammed into the tents and the arena at the Shelby County Fairgrounds, and the fans seemed to revel in watching the horses and the people. To see more photographs and video, visit the bottom of the home page.

  • Fun day

    Despite bad weather throughout the day, Shelby County residents were still able to take part in Shelbyville Horse Show Jubilee activities on Saturday.

    Hundreds of people filled Main Street for the Custom Car Show and the Leo Night and the Moonlighters Street Concert on Saturday night.

    Don Sutton from Simpsonville showed off his 1972 Mustang at the show.

    He said he rarely takes it out of the garage, but his wife suggested he go get it when they stopped by the show on Saturday.

  • Shelby family ignores flu concerns, heads to China for new daughter

    A family from Shelbyville isn't letting the swine flu scare, or an ocean, keep them from their new daughter.

    Mike and Cynthia Pettit of Sherrie Drive, along with their 5-year-old daughter, Marlee, are on their way to China today, where they'll be meeting 18-month-old Maggie.

    And though this is their second trip to China — they found Marlee through an adoption agency when she was 10 months old — this time around brings a new set of concerns.

  • Relatives spice up a Bland reunion

     To say that the Bland family's annual reunion will be "different" is putting it mildly.

    The Blands, a family that can trace its ancestry back to medieval times in England and include a former Shelbyville mayor, are having a larger reunion than most folks. In fact, they're inviting the entire country.

    The Bland National Family Reunion, held at the Stratton Center in Shelbyville last weekend, is a tradition that has been ongoing for the past 25 years, since a group of local Blands met up in Elizabethtown with Blands from Colorado and South Carolina.

  • Joe and Kathy's wild ride

    When Joe and Kathy Ruble plan a trip, they don't.

    The Rubles, a brother and sister who grew up in Simpsonville, met up with the Patriot Guard Riders, a parade of cyclists escorting the remains of three soldiers, when they stopped at the I-64 rest stop near there late last month. The Rubles were supposed to be there just to show support for this solemn  processional.

    But then the Rubles decided to follow the group to a picnic in Winchester.

  • Parade, fireworks celebrate independence

     

    Diann Cook of Shelbyville said one of her favorite parts of the fireworks display at Clear Creek Park on Sunday was how the show began.

  • Old Shelby cabin gets new home

    A cabin likely built in the early 1800s near Simpsonville is on the move again.

    The old cabin has served as an admissions office at Kentucky Country Day School in eastern Jefferson County after it was removed from a farm in the Fields Lane area of Shelby County in 1988. It was donated to the school by Ken and June Martin, who owned about 105 acres of land that included the cabin.

    They donated it at the request of Joe Sorrell, who lived in western Shelby County at the time; he was a science teacher at Country Day.

  • Flags go up in a blaze of glory

    Noble Roberts, chaplain of VFW Post 1179, said that few funeral services are as stirring as those held for Old Glory.

    "There are several different versions of flag-burning ceremonies, but all are very patriotic," he said.

    Roberts, a Coast Guard veteran who said his job was to "patch the flags" on his ship, delivered the eulogy and served as narrator at a flag-retiring ceremony held last Tuesday at Clear Creek Park by the Sons of the American Revolution and the VFW.