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Neighbors

  • Emma Ellis: 1916-2013

    Emma Ellis spent nearly a century devoting herself to serving her community, as a teacher, Red Cross director, scout leader, election poll worker, and raising a large family with her husband, Kennett “Doc” Ellis.

    “Everybody knew Ms. Ellis, the ‘Red Cross lady,’” Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry said. “She worked at the polls from the time I started as county clerk until she wasn’t able to anymore. “

  • Robert Zielinski: 1939-2013

    Robert Francis Zielinski loved community theater, but he loved people even more, a legacy his friends say they will cherish forever.

    “Bob genuinely cared about people,“ said Rick Reinle, who worked with Zielinski at the Shelby County Community Theatre, where they both have acted and directed. “He was a very loving and caring man.”

    Zielinski, 73, of Louisville died Saturday at Norton Suburban Hospital after a long battle with cancer.

  • Harold Thom: 1934-2013

    Shelby County lost a much-loved adopted son last Friday, when Harold Thom, founder and leader of the folk/Bluegrass group The Cumberlands, passed away at age 78.

    Thom, who lost his wife of 55 years, Betty, last year, was semi-retired and owned a horse farm in Simpsonville. After pursuing a brief broadcasting career in radio and television in his hometown of Shreveport, La., in the 1950s, Thom spent 11 years as director and operations manager at KALB-TV in Alexandria, La.

  • Margery Pflughaupt: 1928 -2013

    Margery Pflughaupt so loved the community of Shelbyville that 17 years after moving away, she urged her husband to establish a scholarship fund for Shelby County students that continued for the better part of two decades.

    With her death last week from Alzheimer’s disease at her home in Danville at age 83, her legacy will live on with all the young people that were able to better their lives because of the generosity of her and her husband, Eugene.

  • Alex Chambers Jr.: 1940-2013

    Alex Chambers Jr., a longtime newspaper delivery man, who had worked for The Sentinel-News for 40 years, died suddenly Wednesday at Jewish Hospital in Louisville.

    Chambers, 74, a Shelbyville resident, also had worked in maintenance at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville for 50 years.

    Chambers worked in the very early morning hours, collecting newspapers after they had been assembled for circulation and delivering them to post offices and retail outlets around the county.

  • Fred D. Trammell: 1914-2013

    Although he was a native of McCreary County, Fred Trammell left an indelible mark on Shelby County.

    He became the superintendent of Shelby County Public Schools in 1961 and guided the school board and administration through the consolidation process that led to the merger in 1975 of the Shelby County and Shelbyville school districts, the year after he retired from the position.

    Trammell, who also owned a beef cattle farm in Bagdad, died Saturday at Baptist Hospital East in Louisville. He was 98.

  • Joan Goodwin: 1932-2013 dies at age 80

    Joan Goodwin, who made significant contributions to removing drugs and alcohol issues from Shelby County, died Friday at Masonic Home Shelbyville. She was 80.

    Goodwin was a founder and former director, from 2001 to 2008, of the Shelby County Drug/Alcohol Advisory Council, now Shelby Prevention and also had worked with the Shelbyville Police Department’s Advisory Council.

  • Allen Purnell: He's the ‘goo-od’ guy!

    Clustered around Allen Purnell, a group of employees all answered at once when asked what they thought of their boss.

    "He's gooo-od!" they chorused in unison as Purnell grinned the same easy-going grin he has made famous in his popular television commercials.

    The group gaffawed when asked if they liked sausage.

    "Sure do," said Robert Purnell, the youngest of the Purnell men who work at F.B. Purnell Sausage in Simpsonville.

    "Well, he better," someone else said, amid more laughter.

  • How Shelbyville emerged from the era of racism

    Sitting at ease in his Shelbyville home, retired Shelby County High School teacher and coach Roland Dale, or "Coach Dale" as he's known to former students and athletes, shares his own history and some thoughts on the history of the county's black community; how it was, how it is now, how it ought to be, and his family's part in it all....

  • The legacy of Lincoln Institute

    Writers hate it when they miss an opportunity to write a timely story, and that is what happened to me last fall. I had done some research on the 100th anniversary of the opening of Lincoln Institute in October 1912, and planned to write a story about it. However, in the midst of selling one book, nudging a literary agent along on a second and writing a third, I dropped the ball.