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Neighbors

  • Dover Baptist Church turns 200: A place from the heart

    The pews were overflowing, the voices were overwhelming and the spirit was overpowering on Sunday when perhaps 150 gathered in the little white church to celebrate 200 years of Dover Baptist Church.

  • Ann Harris: Jan. 26, 1911 - Feb. 7, 2014

    The family of First Baptist Church Shelbyville on Friday lost a very faithful member with the passing of Ann Harris.

    Harris, who last month had turned 103, attended church right up until her death, said her longtime friend, Max Doyle.

    “She dearly loved the lord,” he said. “She was always at church, just about every Sunday.”

  • League steps down at Living Waters

    Joel League, as he puts it, has his fingerprints on just about everything that has ever involved Living Waters Church.

    He was there from the beginning – preaching to his congregation in Floral Hall at the Shelby County Fairgrounds when the church was just beginning in 1981.

    He recalled cold days and nights with his fellow church members in the gym of the old Henry Clay Elementary School in Clay Village, which at the time served as the church’s sanctuary.

  • Waddy teens are cousins to ‘brothers’ to ‘buddies’

    Anyone who knows Austin Blocker and Patrick Hargadon recognizes that they are best friends.

    They are also third cousins, a relationship that to some people might seem somewhat distant, but it doesn’t to them.

    “We feel more like brothers than cousins, and that’s how we look at each other,” Blocker said.

  • David Newton: 1929-2012

    “If you didn’t know David Newton, you missed out on a lot.”

    Those were the words of Wayne Puckett, a Clay Village resident, in describing his friend, David Lawson Newton, who passed away last week.

    Newton, a 4-term magistrate and prominent businessman in Shelby County, died Saturday in Louisville. He was 83.

     “Dave was easy going, always happy and laid back, always willing to do anything for anybody,” Puckett said. “He was one of my best friends, and I’m really going to miss him.”

  • ‘Home’ from Africa for the holidays

    Wayne Myers said he always knew he was destined to do God’s work in Africa.

    “I got the calling to be a missionary to Africa when I was just thirteen years old,” he said.

    His wife, Barbara, said her calling was not as specific as far as location at first, but then her desire to minister in Africa began to parallel her husband’s after several years.

  • Saturday with Santa

    A monkey? What in the world do you want with a real monkey?”

    The look of astonishment on Santa’s face and his tone of voice was comparable to when the Jolly Old Elf told “Ralphie” in the movie The Christmas Story that he couldn’t have a Red Ryder BB gun because he’d shoot his eye out.

  • 25th year of lighting up Shelby

    A huge crowd enjoyed almost balmy weather at the Celebration of Lights’ 25th anniversary Saturday in downtown Shelbyville.

    Visitors enjoyed everything from carriage rides to face painting to yummy treats to sidewalk shopping and train rides, all topped off at 6 p.m. with the lighting of the Christmas tree at Veterans Park and singing by several choirs, including the East Middle School Chorus, which sang the National anthem as members of the Shelby County High School ROTC color guard presented the colors.

  • Shaping up Shelby: A gold-medal commitment to fitness

    John Ellis hits the gym six days a week.

    A picture of fitness – he jogs, does some weight training, plays golf every weekend – he’s dedicated to a routine and diet that keeps him healthy and in shape.

    That focus and routine propelled Ellis, 60, to a banner run in his first Kentucky Senior Games in Murray last month, earning him gold medals in doubles tennis and the 50-, 100- and 400-meter sprints and the long jump. He also added a bronze in singles tennis and silvers in the discus and javelin.

  • Behind the doors of a house filled with memories

    You don't see many homes that display as much family history as the stately old mansion on Cropper Road, where four generations of the Thomas family have lived, and that begins in the spacious foyer where a wooden cradle holds a doll near the winding staircase.

    "My father slept here," Ben Allen Thomas III, 92, said, lovingly running his hand over the cradle's dark wood.