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Neighbors

  • 6-year-old Connor Shiffer of Shelby County is a running man

    Connor Shiffer loves to run.  And run…and run… Remember how Forrest Gump ran and ran and ran in the movie, for a very long period of time, only stopping when he felt that he had run all he could run?  This kid is like that in a way, only he really doesn’t like to stop – just ask his parents.

  • Finchville Festival well attended Saturday and Sunday

    The Finchville Festival, held Saturday and Sunday, was well attended by a crowd who got to enjoy beautiful weather along with good food, friends and a great deal of browsing through a ton of items for sale.

  • Simpsonville Fall Festival opens season

    The weather was perfect for the 24th annual Simpsonville Fall Festival on Saturday.

    A large crowd flocked to the city park and lined up along U.S. 60 for the annual parade in festivities that ran from sunup until after dark.

    There was the traditional Purnell’s Sausage breakfast to get the day under way, more games and rides for kids in a new area designed for them. The parade featured a focus on educators in Shelby County who will serve as grand marshals.

  • Grads ‘get to’ the next phase

    The auditorium at the Whitney M, Young Jr. Job Corps campus held nearly a packed house Friday as about 300 friends and family members from all over the nation turned out for commencement exercises for the center's 27 graduates.

  • Laurel W. True: 1933 – 2013

    Not only Shelby County but also the entire state of Kentucky has lost a passionate advocate for the people with the passing of Laurel True.

    “Life with him was a happy, wonderful adventure,” said his wife, Alice True.

    True described her husband as an advocate for people everywhere who were in need.

    “When people think of him, they will remember his service to the people of Kentucky, for his caring for the unloved, the forgotten, the elderly, the mentally ill, for everyone throughout the state,” she said.

  • Shelby man lets his voice be heard again

    On Thursday night, Steven Lee Cook will do something he has done hundreds of times. He will walk onto a stage, grab a microphone, stare into the lights-hidden faces of thousands and unleash The Voice. He will break into a song you likely have heard and maybe even loved, and he will perform with only one knee-knocking difference from all those other stages and microphones: Cook is now 60 years old, and he hasn’t been part of a big-time performance in two decades, since, well, his voice was his life.

  • Emma Ellis: 1916-2013

    Emma Ellis spent nearly a century devoting herself to serving her community, as a teacher, Red Cross director, scout leader, election poll worker, and raising a large family with her husband, Kennett “Doc” Ellis.

    “Everybody knew Ms. Ellis, the ‘Red Cross lady,’” Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry said. “She worked at the polls from the time I started as county clerk until she wasn’t able to anymore. “

  • Rocking out at Red Orchard Park

    Young visitors to Red Orchard Park on Saturday left no stone unturned in their quest for the perfect way to adorn their new "pets" with colorful stripes, dots and even a pair of bobble eyes.

    "His name is going to be Rocky," said 5-year-old Maggie Martinez, proudly holding up her rock pet for the group of about 10 children to inspect.

    The children, accompanied by parents and, in many cases, grandparents, attended a rock-painting activity at the Miller Education Center, sponsored by Clear Creek Trailblazers.

  • Robert Zielinski: 1939-2013

    Robert Francis Zielinski loved community theater, but he loved people even more, a legacy his friends say they will cherish forever.

    “Bob genuinely cared about people,“ said Rick Reinle, who worked with Zielinski at the Shelby County Community Theatre, where they both have acted and directed. “He was a very loving and caring man.”

    Zielinski, 73, of Louisville died Saturday at Norton Suburban Hospital after a long battle with cancer.

  • Behind Shelby's Doors: Reflections of home

    Home is where the heart is – and in David Biagi’s case – where the house is.

    “I wanted to build a place I could always come back to,” he said.

    “Also, we get to see a lot of wildlife, because we can see them from inside the house. The kids really love that.”