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Neighbors

  • Simpsonville Fall Festival opens season

    The weather was perfect for the 24th annual Simpsonville Fall Festival on Saturday.

    A large crowd flocked to the city park and lined up along U.S. 60 for the annual parade in festivities that ran from sunup until after dark.

    There was the traditional Purnell’s Sausage breakfast to get the day under way, more games and rides for kids in a new area designed for them. The parade featured a focus on educators in Shelby County who will serve as grand marshals.

  • Grads ‘get to’ the next phase

    The auditorium at the Whitney M, Young Jr. Job Corps campus held nearly a packed house Friday as about 300 friends and family members from all over the nation turned out for commencement exercises for the center's 27 graduates.

  • Shelby man lets his voice be heard again

    On Thursday night, Steven Lee Cook will do something he has done hundreds of times. He will walk onto a stage, grab a microphone, stare into the lights-hidden faces of thousands and unleash The Voice. He will break into a song you likely have heard and maybe even loved, and he will perform with only one knee-knocking difference from all those other stages and microphones: Cook is now 60 years old, and he hasn’t been part of a big-time performance in two decades, since, well, his voice was his life.

  • Rocking out at Red Orchard Park

    Young visitors to Red Orchard Park on Saturday left no stone unturned in their quest for the perfect way to adorn their new "pets" with colorful stripes, dots and even a pair of bobble eyes.

    "His name is going to be Rocky," said 5-year-old Maggie Martinez, proudly holding up her rock pet for the group of about 10 children to inspect.

    The children, accompanied by parents and, in many cases, grandparents, attended a rock-painting activity at the Miller Education Center, sponsored by Clear Creek Trailblazers.

  • Behind Shelby's Doors: Reflections of home

    Home is where the heart is – and in David Biagi’s case – where the house is.

    “I wanted to build a place I could always come back to,” he said.

    “Also, we get to see a lot of wildlife, because we can see them from inside the house. The kids really love that.”

  • Shelby resident develops a hobby of a lifetime

    Like most young boys, I enjoyed playing with toy soldiers as a kid. Unlike most young boys, I stuck with it, and turned it into much more than a game of “bang, bang, your guy is dead!” or knocking figures over with marbles.

    Even as a youngster, growing up “down under” in New Zealand, I was a bit of a history nut. I wasn’t quite so interested in the mass destruction potential of warfare as the “why did they do it that way?” And the “how could I have done it better?” problem-solving and strategic study aspects.

  • Shelby's Biagi family will celebrate 100 years American life

    Planning a family reunion to celebrate a 100-year-old anniversary has stirred up a lot of excitement in Shelby County among members of the Biagi family.

    On July 6, members of the Biagi family, not only from Shelby, but from all over Kentucky and the United States, will gather on Magnolia Street at the home of Greg Biagi to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the family’s coming to America.

  • An ahh of a day for men's health fair in Shelby

    Shelby County men turned out by the hundreds for Jewish Hospital Shelbyville's 13th Annual Men's Health Fair on Saturday, surpassing the 300 mark, officials said, and topping the 250 that usually attend each year.

    "It's been a great year," JHS spokesperson Holly Husband said.

    Tony Carriss, who orchestrated the first health fair after a bout with prostate cancer and now chairs the committee that puts on the event, said he was amazed and gratified with the large attendance.

  • The man with the Colonel’s suit

    With his connections to the area, many in Shelby County have a story to share about an encounter with the colorful Col. Harland Sanders, founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken.

    But how many of them got to ride in his famed white Cadillac limousine?

    How many got to have dinner with him on a regular basis?

    How many could call him a family friend?

    And how many could say he gave them one of his famous white suits, complete with black bolo tie, for a Halloween party?

    And even more, how many could say the Colonel lived in his home?

  • A vision of the past

    Sitting well back off of KY 55 just a little south of Finchville is a hidden gem of a home for history buffs. The Greek Revival-style home’s original front was built in 1837, and it became known as Sylvan Shades by its second owner.

    “It was actually built by a man named Newland, and he sold the home to Thomas Doolan,” current owner John Test said. “After that it remained in the Doolan family until we purchased it in 1985.”