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Neighbors

  • Cooks share holiday recipes

    Oh, the holidays, decking the tables and countertops and computer desks and, yes, even the bedside table, with platters and trays and candy dishes with yummy treats.

    Everyone has a favorite holiday dish, and many of you probably bring some of your best efforts and gifts to work to share with coworkers.

    Like Patricia Ann McKinney, for example, a clerk at the Shelby County Sheriff’s office, who made Haystacks  and almond bark cookies.

    “These recipes have been around for a long time,” she says.

  • Holiday Recipes

    Jeanne Kemper’s Jam Cake

    5 eggs, lightly beaten

    2 cups sugar

    3 cups flour

    1 cup butter

    1 cup buttermilk

    1 teaspoon soda

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    2 teaspoons cinnamon

    ½ teaspoon cloves

    ¼ teaspoon allspice

    ¼ teaspoon nutmeg

    1 cup raisins

    1 cup chopped pecans

    1 ½ cup seedless raspberry jam

     

  • Shelby man had a story he had to share

    Marshall Phillips had a story he wanted to tell, one from the earth in Shelby County to the villages of East Africa and back, so he did what most people only think of doing: He sat down and wrote a book.

    Phillips has published He Leadeth Me, which he calls an autobiography that’s about half about his life as a farm boy from Chestnut Grove and the rest about the years he served as a minister and with the Southern Baptist Church’s Foreign Mission Board in Kenya and Tanganyika.

  • Herbert S. Kays: 1937-2011

    Dr. Herbert S. Kays was a man who wore many hats in his day, but even more than for his time spent as an educator, dentist, or star high school athlete, many will remember him for was his kind-natured spirit.

    Charles Clifton was a Shelbyville native who knew Herbie Kays well.

    “Of all his accomplishments, he was a good man and a good friend. I can’t pay him any higher complement,” he said.

    Kays passed away Oct. 27 at the age of 73.

  • Betty Thom: 1936-2011

    A stunning death has taken the life of a well-known musician and folk singer who lived near Simpsonville.

    Betty Thom, one of the original founding members of the folk/bluegrass group, The Cumberlands, passed away in her sleep, said her husband of 55 years, Harold Thom.

    “She was the most wonderful, loving, compassionate, kind, brilliant lady,” he said. “She was one in a billion.”

  • True blue and Santa, too

    The weather wasn’t quite delightful, but neither was it frightful Saturday at the Christmas Parade, an event that had a specific theme this year.

    Touted as the Red, White and Blue American Christmas, the parade down Main Street featured 20 floats, up a few from last year, many of which featured patriotic themes, a couple of them depicting Ground Zero on Sept. 11, 2001.

  • Thomas Keith Peterson: 1952-2011

    Tom Peterson was considered in the journalism community not only a veteran reporter but also a person whom many colleagues considered a mentor. He died Nov. 11 at the age of 59.

    “Tom was a tenacious reporter who was really dedicated to the pursuit of truth,” said Jack Brammer, a Shelbyville resident and reporter with  The Herald-Leader in Lexington who worked with Peterson in the 1970s at The Sentinel-News.

    “Tom really did a lot for the paper; he put a lot more emphasis on hard news and investigative reporting.

  • Shelby County woman is avid long-distance hiker

    Judy Young said she realized late in life that her boots were made for more than just walking – they were made for hiking long-distance trails.

    Young, 66, has by her estimation trail-hiked more than 3,000 miles since retiring in 1997 as a teacher from the Shelby County school system. Her foot-trips, some of which she has done by herself, have taken her coast-to-coast in the United States and to several overseas destinations.

    But before she could take her first journey, she had to avoid stumbling over the loving objections of family and friends.

  • ‘I thought I was dead’

    Steve Miller lay in a hospital bed for one of the many days he spent there, drifting in and out of consciousness, enduring debilitating pain and distress, surrounded by family, friends and coworkers who shared the question that reverberated around his mind and pulsed through his veins: Am I going to die?

    His boss, U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie, was there to hold his hand. His wife, Donna, kept after the doctors and nurses as the pain and disorientation that followed what he thought would be a rather simple heart procedure slowly but assuredly overwhelmed him.

  • Looking Back: November 18, 2011

    Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.