.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Neighbors

  • Shelby's Fabulous 5: Jerry Miller

    History means a lot to Jerry Miller, so much so that he dedicated three years to a project he thought was one of the most worthwhile historic projects he has ever been involved in – the Skirmish near Simpsonville Memorial.

    “It was so neat to be involved in a project related to history, which I absolutely love. It was like a mystery unraveling,” he said of all the research and work that went into completing the memorial.

  • Shelby artist’s oil painting on card for troops

    If you know a member of the service who is serving overseas this holiday season, that person may have received a holiday card through a Red Cross program that included artwork that originated in Shelby County.

    Mary C. Yaeger’s oil painting of a bright red cardinal against a stark winter day was chosen for the cover of a holiday greeting card as part of the American Red Cross American Heroes program.

  • Shelby man left homeless by fire getting help from community

    One year ago today, a fire swept through a home at 312 Henry Clay Street, leaving one brother in the hospital and another homeless.

    John Pearson eventually died from second-degree burns he received over the top portion of his body, and his bother “Booger” Bill Pearson, 69, was left homeless.

    A spark of community fellowship helped raise several thousand dollars for the brothers, but it turns out that won’t be enough.

  • Historical society honors 3

    A crowd of 77 people gathered Thursday night at the Shelby County Historical Society at a reception to honor two members of the society, Thomas Arington and the late Lisa Matthews.

    Past president Bill Matthews, who is editor of the historical society’s quarterly newsletter/magazine and father of Lisa Matthews, said he was very pleased with the turnout.

    “Everything went quite well,” he said.

  • Cooks share holiday recipes

    Oh, the holidays, decking the tables and countertops and computer desks and, yes, even the bedside table, with platters and trays and candy dishes with yummy treats.

    Everyone has a favorite holiday dish, and many of you probably bring some of your best efforts and gifts to work to share with coworkers.

    Like Patricia Ann McKinney, for example, a clerk at the Shelby County Sheriff’s office, who made Haystacks  and almond bark cookies.

    “These recipes have been around for a long time,” she says.

  • Holiday Recipes

    Jeanne Kemper’s Jam Cake

    5 eggs, lightly beaten

    2 cups sugar

    3 cups flour

    1 cup butter

    1 cup buttermilk

    1 teaspoon soda

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    2 teaspoons cinnamon

    ½ teaspoon cloves

    ¼ teaspoon allspice

    ¼ teaspoon nutmeg

    1 cup raisins

    1 cup chopped pecans

    1 ½ cup seedless raspberry jam

     

  • Shelby man had a story he had to share

    Marshall Phillips had a story he wanted to tell, one from the earth in Shelby County to the villages of East Africa and back, so he did what most people only think of doing: He sat down and wrote a book.

    Phillips has published He Leadeth Me, which he calls an autobiography that’s about half about his life as a farm boy from Chestnut Grove and the rest about the years he served as a minister and with the Southern Baptist Church’s Foreign Mission Board in Kenya and Tanganyika.

  • Herbert S. Kays: 1937-2011

    Dr. Herbert S. Kays was a man who wore many hats in his day, but even more than for his time spent as an educator, dentist, or star high school athlete, many will remember him for was his kind-natured spirit.

    Charles Clifton was a Shelbyville native who knew Herbie Kays well.

    “Of all his accomplishments, he was a good man and a good friend. I can’t pay him any higher complement,” he said.

    Kays passed away Oct. 27 at the age of 73.

  • Betty Thom: 1936-2011

    A stunning death has taken the life of a well-known musician and folk singer who lived near Simpsonville.

    Betty Thom, one of the original founding members of the folk/bluegrass group, The Cumberlands, passed away in her sleep, said her husband of 55 years, Harold Thom.

    “She was the most wonderful, loving, compassionate, kind, brilliant lady,” he said. “She was one in a billion.”

  • True blue and Santa, too

    The weather wasn’t quite delightful, but neither was it frightful Saturday at the Christmas Parade, an event that had a specific theme this year.

    Touted as the Red, White and Blue American Christmas, the parade down Main Street featured 20 floats, up a few from last year, many of which featured patriotic themes, a couple of them depicting Ground Zero on Sept. 11, 2001.