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Neighbors

  • Shelby's prominent deaths in 2011: Miller, Armstrong headline noted group

    The passing in 2011 of four men who showed their love for Shelby County in a variety of ways – with public service and determined legacies – left significant gaps in the foundation of the community.

    All of them served in their unique ways, but perhaps none of them expanded the imprint of Shelby County more than Clarence Miller, who died in August at the age of 98.

  • Other Fab 5 nominees

    We couldn’t pick everyone, but you nominated dozens of others as possibles for Shelby’s Fabulous 5 2011:

    Charles Binion, Waddy Ruritan member

    Jerry Bowling, Shelbyville community volunteer

    Marti Brown, Father’s Love Children’s Church

    Jessica Carter, 12-year-old who helps children

    Willie Goodwin, hometown hero passed away

    Judy Phillips, Shelby County Touched Twice

    Hubert Pollett, community booster

    RobFest volunteers, fundraiser support

  • Shelby's Fabulous 5: Geoffrey McGuillen

    The Sentinel-Newssince 2008 has honored at year’s end five Shelby Countians we think have had a significant impact on our community during this year. For the first time, we asked for your nominations on our Facebook page, and we believe each person selected for what we call Shelby County’s Fabulous 5 has in his or her own way left an imprint that merits our honoring and emulating, represents a broad spectrum of a diverse society and truly is one of the best of our best.

     

  • Shelby's Fabulous 5: Tom and Ruth Hodge

    Tom and Ruth Hodge own both Its Convenient stores located on U.S. 60, and for the past few decades, they have been known for their efforts in treating their customers like family.

    The Hodges make it a point to help out people in need in the community, and their most recent effort was collecting thousands of dollars for Bill Pearson, an elderly man who lost his home on Henry Clay Street in a fire that killed his brother. 

  • Shelby's Fabulous 5: Gary Walls

    Gary Walls is a man with a mission: Nothing too big, just working to raise thousands of dollars to help people change their lives, that’s all.

    Walls is the co-founder and past president of Shelby County Community Charities, an organization that he and some others started in 1996 to raise money for families who have children or young adults in serious need of surgeries they can’t afford.

  • Shelby's Fabulous 5: Mary Marshall

    Mary Marshall spent 40 years coaching youth sports, ever since graduating from high school in the early 1950s.

    A single mother, Marshall, who found herself divorced at an early age, raised 7 children on her own, which in itself is no small accomplishment.

     “And they all went to college,”  she said with well-deserved pride.

    Marshall, who was quite athletic herself, had a passion for sports at an early age, coaching softball, soccer and baseball even before graduating from the Lincoln Institute in Simpsonville in 1952.

  • Shelby's Fabulous 5: Jerry Miller

    History means a lot to Jerry Miller, so much so that he dedicated three years to a project he thought was one of the most worthwhile historic projects he has ever been involved in – the Skirmish near Simpsonville Memorial.

    “It was so neat to be involved in a project related to history, which I absolutely love. It was like a mystery unraveling,” he said of all the research and work that went into completing the memorial.

  • Shelby artist’s oil painting on card for troops

    If you know a member of the service who is serving overseas this holiday season, that person may have received a holiday card through a Red Cross program that included artwork that originated in Shelby County.

    Mary C. Yaeger’s oil painting of a bright red cardinal against a stark winter day was chosen for the cover of a holiday greeting card as part of the American Red Cross American Heroes program.

  • Shelby man left homeless by fire getting help from community

    One year ago today, a fire swept through a home at 312 Henry Clay Street, leaving one brother in the hospital and another homeless.

    John Pearson eventually died from second-degree burns he received over the top portion of his body, and his bother “Booger” Bill Pearson, 69, was left homeless.

    A spark of community fellowship helped raise several thousand dollars for the brothers, but it turns out that won’t be enough.

  • Historical society honors 3

    A crowd of 77 people gathered Thursday night at the Shelby County Historical Society at a reception to honor two members of the society, Thomas Arington and the late Lisa Matthews.

    Past president Bill Matthews, who is editor of the historical society’s quarterly newsletter/magazine and father of Lisa Matthews, said he was very pleased with the turnout.

    “Everything went quite well,” he said.